02-20-2024  6:19 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
  • Supporters of Issue 1, the Right to Reproductive Freedom amendment, attend a rally in Columbus, Ohio, Oct. 8, 2023. Some state governments and a federal agency are moving to block companies from selling geolocation data that shows who's been to abortion providers, among other places. (AP Photo/Joe Maiorana, File)

    States Aim to Protect Health Data Used in Abortion Battle 

    State governments across the U.S. are adopting or considering laws that would block the sale of personal health data or information about who visits sensitive sites such as sexual health facilities. Medical records are protected by a federal privacy law, but information collected by a lot of apps is not and state legislation is trying to close that gap. Data privacy ihas been a growing concern since the.Supreme Court overturned Read More
  • KGW Apologizes After Airing Racist Image

    KGW Apologizes After Airing Racist Image

    Television station KGW says it deeply regrets inadvertently showing a racist image during a segment called “The Good Stuff,” which invited viewers to share “cheesy, silly, or memorable” photos from the past. The 1950s image showed children throwing balls towards a sign prominently displaying a racial slur. KGW apologised for “the profound hurt this image inflicted upon our viewers and staff, particularly members of our Black community.” Leaders of the Read More
  • Author Michael Thurmond speaks poses for a portrait, Friday, Jan. 26, 2024, in Stone Mountain, Ga. A new book by Michael Thurmond entitled “James Oglethorpe, Father of Georgia” focuses on Georgia's white founding father’s failed attempt to ban slavery after starting Britain's 13th American colony in 1733. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

    A Black Author Looks at Failed Attempt by Founder of Georgia to Ban Slavery

    Black author Michael Thurmond says Georgia's white founding father deserves credit for inspiring the abolitionist movement that ultimately ended slavery. His new book - “James Oglethorpe, Father of Georgia” --focuses on Oglethorpe's failed attempt to ban slavery after starting Britain's 13th American colony in 1733. Georgia's early prohibition on slavery ended and Oglethorpe returned to England where he inspired activists who would become Britain's first abolitionists Read More
  • Mpho Molutsi from the Children’s Radio Foundation during a live community broadcast in Johannesburg. Gulshan Khan/AFP/Getty Images

    100 Years of Radio in Africa: From Propaganda to People’s Power

    Radio is thriving across Africa. Exact figures are difficult to come by because audience research differs across countries. But studies estimate radio listenership to be between 60% and 80% of the continent’s 1.4 billion population. Read More
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NORTHWEST NEWS

KGW Apologizes After Airing Racist Image

Television station KGW says it deeply regrets inadvertently showing a racist image during a segment called “The Good Stuff,” which invited viewers to share “cheesy, silly, or memorable” photos from the past. The 1950s image showed children throwing balls towards a sign prominently displaying a racial slur. KGW apologised for “the profound hurt this image inflicted upon our viewers and staff, particularly members of our Black community.” Leaders of the Portland NAACP chapter said they were appalled

Rep. Blumenauer Talks Retirement from Congress and His Plans to Help Put Portland Back Together

U.S. Representative for Oregon has held his seat for nearly 30 years.

Former Audubon Group Changes Name to ‘Bird Alliance of Oregon’

Portland Audubon has changed its name to the “Bird Alliance of Oregon," in the latest example of a local chapter to do so because of John James Audubon’s views as a slave owner. While the national organization opted to keep its name, other local chapters have changed theirs, including those in Seattle, Chicago and Detroit.

Childcare, Rural Investment, Wealth Creation, ‘Actually’ Affordable Housing: State BIPOC Caucus Talks Priorities at Start of Legislative Session

The Skanner spoke with BIPOC Caucus policy and communications vice chair Rep. Travis Nelson (D-Portland, Dist. 44) for a session preview. 

NEWS BRIEFS

Wyden, Merkley Announce $70,000 for the Oregon Food Bank

“Nothing is more important than making sure folks in need have food to eat, and the resources to thrive,” Wyden...

Historic Church in Seattle Hosts Free Black History Month Film Series for All

New Hope Missionary Baptist Church, located in Seattle’s historic Central District, will host “Freedom Fridays: A Black History...

Attorney General Rosenblum: Gun Safety Law Enacted By Voters Should Take Effect Now

Measure 114 establishes reasonable public safety regulations that do not unduly burden the right of self-defense. ...

Guardrail Repair Work to Impact Traffic on Morrison Bridge S.E. Belmont Ramp

On Wednesday, Feb. 14 from 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. the Morrison Bridge S.E. Belmont Street exit lane to S.E. Martin Luther King Jr....

Solemn monument to Japanese American WWII detainees lists more than 125,000 names

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Samantha Sumiko Pinedo and her grandparents file into a dimly lit enclosure at the Japanese American National Museum and approach a massive book splayed open to reveal columns of names. Pinedo is hoping the list includes her great-grandparents, who were detained in Japanese...

State governments looking to protect health-related data as it's used in abortion battle

Some state governments and federal regulators were already moving to keep individuals' reproductive health information private when a U.S. senator’s report last week offered a new jolt, describing how cellphone location data was used to send millions of anti-abortion ads to people who visited...

East and Missouri host No. 5 Tennessee

Tennessee Volunteers (19-6, 9-3 SEC) at Missouri Tigers (8-17, 0-12 SEC) Columbia, Missouri; Tuesday, 7 p.m. EST FANDUEL SPORTSBOOK LINE: Volunteers -11.5; over/under is 146.5 BOTTOM LINE: Missouri hosts the No. 5 Tennessee Volunteers after Sean East scored...

Arizona hires Desireé Reed-Francois as athletic director to navigate move to Big 12

TUCSON, Ariz. (AP) — Arizona has hired former Missouri athletic director Desireé Reed-Francois to guide the athletics department through financial difficulties prior to the school's move to the Big 12. Reed-Francois agreed to terms Monday on a five-year contract that will start at...

OPINION

Ending Unfair Contracts Harming Minority Businesses Will Aid Gov. Kotek’s Affordable Housing Goals

Senate Bill 1575 will protect small businesses from state and local government’s unfair contract practices while also allowing the building industry to help the governor meet her affordable housing project goals. ...

February is American Heart Month

This month is a time to recognize that heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States, especially in the African American community ...

Thrilling History of Black Excellence in Our National Parks

In every facet of American life -from exploration; conquest; defense; economy; resistance; conservation and the pursuit of human rights – I can show you a unit of the National Park System where the event took place, where African Americans made the...

The Future of Sexual & Reproductive Health Care Begins with Listening to Black Women

Repairing historic harm begins with trust — because we know that when Black women thrive, we all thrive. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

For Black ‘nones’ who leave religion, what’s next?

(RNS) — When Black Americans leave religion, it’s rarely a clean break. Take Rogiérs Fibby, a self-described agnostic, atheist and secular humanist who grew up in the Moravian Church. The head of the Washington, D.C., chapter of the Black Secular Collective, Fibby also considers...

Attorneys for Georgia slave descendants urge judge not to throw out their lawsuit over island zoning

SAVANNAH, Ga. (AP) — Attorneys suing a Georgia county over zoning changes that they say threaten one of the South's last Gullah-Geechee communities of Black slave descendants asked a judge Tuesday to let them correct technical problems with their civil complaint to avoid having it dismissed. ...

US appeals court to decide if Pennsylvania mail-in ballots with wrong date still count

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — A federal appeals court must decide if Pennsylvania voters need to put accurate handwritten dates on the outside envelopes of their mail-in ballots for the votes to count, a dispute with implications for this year's presidential contest. The 3rd U.S. Circuit...

ENTERTAINMENT

Prince Harry races head-first down a skeleton sled track and says 'everybody should do this'

WHISTLER, British Columbia (AP) — Prince Harry raced head-first on a tiny skeleton sled going 99 kph (61.5 mph) down a track at next year’s Invictus Games site Thursday, saying with a smile afterward that everyone should do it. Harry was in Whistler, British Columbia, with wife...

Transform Asian kitchen staples into an umami-packed vegetarian soup

It’s a common misconception that the best soups require long ingredient lists and hours of simmering. In fact, just a handful of high-flavor items can be transformed into an umami-bomb of a soup in just 45 minutes. In this recipe from our book “Cook What You Have,” we get the job done thanks...

Seven-time NASCAR champ Jimmie Johnson welcomes Creed to Daytona 500 with arms wide open

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. (AP) — Jimmie Johnson and his Legacy Motor Club race team welcomed Creed to NASCAR with arms wide open. So singer Scott Stapp and the rest of the multi-platinum rock band filled them — they handed Johnson an autographed guitar. Johnson, a two-time Daytona 500...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Biden wants people to know most of the money he's seeking for Ukraine would be spent in the US

MESQUITE, Texas (AP) — At a bustling construction site outside of Dallas, there are hopes that Congress can...

Welcome to the 'Hotel California' case: The trial over handwritten lyrics to an Eagles classic

NEW YORK (AP) — In the mid-1970s, the Eagles were working on a spooky, cryptic new song. On a...

College Football Playoff approves 5+7 format and reduces spots for conference champions

The field for the 12-team College Football Playoff beginning next season will comprise five conference champions...

Ransomware group LockBit is disrupted by a global police operation that includes 2 arrests

LONDON (AP) — Law enforcement agencies have infiltrated and disrupted the prolific ransomware syndicate LockBit...

White House promises 'major sanctions' on Russia in response to Alexei Navalny's death

WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House said Tuesday it is preparing additional “major sanctions” on Russia in...

A Russian court extends the pretrial detention for an American reporter accused of spying

MOSCOW (AP) — A court in the Russian capital ruled Tuesday to keep Wall Street Journal reporter Evan Gershkovich...

By The Skanner News | The Skanner News

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Poet and author Maya Angelou is taking issue with a paraphrased quotation from Martin Luther King Jr. inscribed in his new memorial in Washington, saying the shortened version makes the civil rights leader sound like an "arrogant twit" because it's out of context.

The words were from a sermon King delivered Feb. 4, 1968, at Atlanta's Ebenezer Baptist Church, two months before he was assassinated, about a eulogy that could be given when he died.

King said, "Yes, if you want to say that I was a drum major, say that I was a drum major for justice. Say that I was a drum major for peace. I was a drum major for righteousness. And all of the other shallow things will not matter."

On Tuesday, Angelou, who consulted on the memorial, told The Washington Post (http://wapo.st/o74pLU ) that the shortened version of those words sounds egotistical and should be changed.

It reads: "I was a drum major for justice, peace and righteousness."

The phrase is inscribed on a statue of King without quotation marks because it is paraphrased. It is not grouped with 14 quotations from King that are part of the memorial plaza.

The paraphrased version "minimizes the man," said the 83-year-old Angelou. "It makes him seem less than the humanitarian he was. ... It makes him seem an egotist."

King would have never said of himself that he was a drum major, Angelou said, but rather that others might say that of him.

"He had a humility that comes from deep inside," Angelou told the Post. "The `if' clause that is left out is salient. Leaving it out changes the meaning completely."

Memorial planners said they were fond of the quotation but that it had to be shortened because of a change during the King statute's creation. They originally planned to use most of the "drum major" quote but changed its placement, and sculptor Lei Yixin told them there wasn't enough space.

"We sincerely felt passionate that the man's own eulogy should be expressed on the stone," said Ed Jackson Jr., executive architect of the memorial. "We said the least we could do was define who he was based on his perception of himself: `I was a drum major for this, this and this.'"

Project planners outlined the problem and their proposed solution to the U.S. Commission of Fine Arts, which had to approve the memorial's design. The federal arts panel did not object, Jackson said.

Angelou was one of the memorial's Council of Historians tasked with selecting the inscriptions for the memorial. But she did not attend meetings about the inscriptions, Jackson said.

Two other memorial advisers were consulted, Jon Onye Lockard and James Chaffers of the University of Michigan. But Jackson said he ultimately had to make the decision.

Lockard told the Post he was fine with the shortened inscription.

"If there's any comment about anything, it's late," he said, noting others also have recently criticized pieces of the memorial. "I think it's rather small of folks to pick at things. ... This has been going on for 14 years, and all of them have had plenty of time to add their thoughts and ideas."

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The Skanner Foundation's 38th Annual MLK Breakfast