02-07-2023  12:50 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Arrest Made in Stolen Yacht Rescue, 'Goonies' Fish Incident

Oregon police called it a series of “really odd” events along the Pacific Northwest coast spanning 48 hours that concluded Friday night with the arrest of a Canadian man.

Portland Cop Fired for Leaking False Allegations Against City Commissioner Reinstated

Mayor Ted Wheeler fired Brian Hunzeker after he leaked a false complaint saying city Commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty had been involved in a hit-and-run crash.

Hundreds of Portland City Workers on Strike for Better Pay

Workers represented by the union Laborers’ Local 483 have been without a contract since June. Negotiations over a new four-year deal broke down in December

Washington State Gov. Inslee Tests Positive for COVID-19

He plans to continue working. Trudi Inslee, the first spouse, has tested negative.

NEWS BRIEFS

Washington State Arts Commission and Department of Veteran Affairs Partner to Support Veterans Through the Arts

0,000 in grants will support arts programming across four Veteran Homes ...

The Black Business Association of Oregon Hires its First Communications Director

Previously, Sommer Martin was director of downtown marketing for the Portland Business Alliance ...

Allen Temple C.M.E. Church Announces Annual Unsung Heroes & Heroines Award Luncheon

The purpose of the award is to acknowledge and honor individuals and/or organizations who are unsung heroes/heroines who make a...

Bonamici Invites Portland Community College President to 2023 State of the Union

PCC recently received 0K to advance semiconductor, advanced manufacturing training ...

Market Features Work of Local Black-Owned Businesses for Black History Month

MESO Makers Market in Portland to feature the work of 40 local, Black-owned small businesses to celebrate Black History Month in...

1 missing, 2 rescued from crab boat off Washington coast

RAYMOND, Wash. (AP) — A crew member remains missing and two others were rescued from crab boat that sank near Willapa Bay in southwest Washington on Sunday evening, according to the Coast Guard. The Coast Guard on Twitter posted a video and said a helicopter crew from Astoria,...

Proposed bill would pay incarcerated workers minimum wage

OLYMPIA, Wash. (AP) — A Washington state lawmaker who has spent time in prison wants the state to pay incarcerated workers minimum wage for doing their jobs. State Rep. Tarra Simmons, D-Bremerton, is sponsoring House Bill 1024, called the “Real Labor, Real Wages Act,” to raise...

Jones scores 18, Southern Illinois tops Missouri State 73-53

CARBONDALE, Ill. (AP) — Lance Jones' 18 points helped Southern Illinois defeat Missouri State 73-53 on Sunday. Jones also added four steals for the Salukis (18-7, 10-4 Missouri Valley Conference). Troy D'Amico shot 5 of 6 from the field and 4 for 4 from the line to add 15 points....

DeVries and Drake earn 85-82 2OT win over Valparaiso

VALPARAISO, Ind. (AP) — Tucker DeVries scored a career-high 32 points and grabbed 11 rebounds and Drake beat Valparaiso 85-82 in double overtime on Saturday night. Roman Penn scored 16 points and added 12 rebounds and six assists for the Bulldogs (19-6, 10-4 Missouri Valley...

OPINION

Updates That May Affect Your Tax Season

The IRS released a statement that taxpayers should brace themselves for small tax refunds due to no economic impact payments ...

Unaffordable Rental Costs Now Plague 44 Million People in Every State Economic Inequality Places Most Risk of Eviction on Blacks and the Poor

For the first time in more than two decades of research, every state now has renters who are nearing a financial breaking point in housing affordability. ...

The Beating and Murder of Mr. Tyre Nichols, A Black Man

Time to Abolish the Criminal Injustice System ...

It's Time to Irrigate the Fallow Ground of Minority Media Ownership

In 2023, one aspect of civil rights and racial justice that barely remains addressed is racial inclusion in media ownership. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

How Candid hopes diversity data will help aid racial equity

Candid, the major philanthropy research group, is leading a coalition of funders and grantees that want to standardize the collection of demographic information to help enable donations to minority-led groups. Harnessing such data could help advance racial equity, said Candid's CEO,...

What to Watch: New political vibes this State of the Union

WASHINGTON (AP) — Look for new faces and fresh political dynamics as President Joe Biden delivers this year's State of the Union address, coupled with attention to some old problems brought back into painful focus by recent events. The president on Tuesday night will stand before a...

Arkansas Gov. Sanders to offer State of the Union rebuttal

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Arkansas Gov. Sarah Huckabee Sanders, once a White House press secretary for President Donald Trump, is set to return to the national stage when she delivers the GOP response to President Joe Biden’s State of the Union address. Sanders, 40, is giving the...

ENTERTAINMENT

Grammys rebound from COVID years, reach 12.4 million viewers

NEW YORK (AP) — An estimated 12.4 million people tuned in to watch stars Harry Styles, Lizzo and Bad Bunny perform at the Grammy Awards, along with a tribute to 50 years of rap history. That's up from the pandemic-affected broadcasts of the last two years, the Nielsen company said...

AMC to charge more for good seats in movie theaters

NEW YORK (AP) — Middle seats at many U.S. movie theaters just got more expensive. AMC Theaters, the nation's largest movie theater chain, on Monday unveiled a new pricing scheme in which seat location determines how much your movie ticket costs. Seats in the middle of the...

The Grammys ended in controversy, again. Here’s what to know

NEW YORK (AP) — A night in music brimming with shocking upsets, historic wins, tributes for artists like the late rapper Takeoff and hip-hop’s 50th anniversary, the 65th Grammys were back in full swing Sunday. Once again, Beyoncé was in the running for the top honor. Once again,...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Google hopes 'Bard' will outsmart ChatGPT, Microsoft in AI

Google is girding for a battle of wits in the field of artificial intelligence with “Bard," a conversational...

At last: Streisand memoir 'My Name is Barbra' coming Nov. 7

NEW YORK (AP) — Barbra Streisand's very long and very long-awaited memoir, a project she has talked about for...

Gallup: Just 2 in 10 U.S. employees have work `best friend'

NEW YORK (AP) — Crystal Powers began a new job remotely in February 2022 as a medical records supervisor. She...

Russia pledges military support to Mali during Lavrov visit

BAMAKO, Mali (AP) — Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov pledged military support to Mali during his first...

Dog owners tout Xolos' loyalty and sacred underworld history

MEXICO CITY (AP) — Mezcal is not your ordinary pet. Hundreds of years ago the Latin American Indigenous group,...

A glance at the world's deadliest quakes in past 25 years

A magnitude 7.8 earthquake shook Turkey and Syria on Monday, killing thousands of people in the two countries....

CNN Wire Staff

MANILA, Philippines (CNN) -- Millions of people in the Philippines suffered further torrential rains Wednesday, as deadly floods claimed several more lives and kept many people from returning to their deluged homes.

Forecasters say still more rain is on the way, fueled by seasonal monsoon rains and a nearby tropical storm, but it should start to ease soon.

The reported death toll rose to 16 as the flooding continued, the state-run Philippines News Agency reported.

A landslide in the Manila suburb of Quezon City buried two houses Tuesday, leaving nine people dead and four others injured, according to the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Center. Three of the dead were children, PNA reported.

Seven more deaths were attributed to drowning and electrocution.

As of Wednesday night, the rain was still falling but was beginning to ease across portions of western Luzon, according to CNN forecaster Taylor Ward, a trend expected to continue over the next 24 to 48 hours.

The capital city of Manila has recorded 864 millimeters (34 inches) of rain in 72 hours, compared with an August average of just under 500 millimeters (20 inches). Some surrounding areas have been deluged by over 1 meter (39 inches) of rain in the same three-day period.

The latest downpours came on top of days of rain that had already drenched the area, with August generally the wettest month of the year.

Flooding will continue to be a problem even as the rains lessen, as there is just nowhere for the water to go, Ward said.

Some of the Manila region's 12 million residents returned to work Wednesday, with some stores reopening and heavy congestion on the sodden roads, but the real clean-up is expected to start Thursday.

"It's like a water world," Benito Ramos, head of the country's disaster agency, said of the city Tuesday, according to PNA.

The flooding has forced more than 780,000 people across the country from their homes, the disaster agency said. About 242,000 were staying in emergency shelters Tuesday night, according to the agency.

Many hoped to return to their homes Wednesday but further torrential rains in the afternoon were a setback to efforts to get back to normal.

It may be a while before people can safely leave the shelters, said CNN forecaster Mari Ramos.

An additional concern is that the water will take days, or perhaps weeks, to recede in the lower-lying areas, she said. There could also be further flooding "downstream" as the water drains through the flood plain in the southern portions of the metro area near Laguna de Bay.

This is an area that frequently suffers from serious flooding and was one of the hardest hit during the historic flooding that came with Tropical Storm Ketsana (local name Ondoy) in 2009, Ramos said.

Families who returned to their homes in parts of Quezon City, in metropolitan Manila, found fast-running waters sweeping piles of debris along flooded streets.

Some took to boats to try to recover valuables from the wreckage of their homes, or sought to bail out their flooded rooms with buckets.

CNN iReporter Amoulin Singh said the flooding and rains where he lives in Sampaloc, Manila, were the worst he had seen since Tropical Storm Ondoy walloped the country.

"There's been heavy rain for the past 24 hours and we probably get around 10 minutes of breathing room before the next downpour," Singh, a 28-year-old businessman, said Wednesday.

"The flood is knee-high and slowly rising -- it has entered almost all of the houses in the neighborhood. People are headed to convenience stores to stock on supplies. Everybody is in a bad spot right now."

Rescue requests continued to come in early Wednesday, including some people who were using Twitter to contact the authorities for help.

"Pregnant woman needs help! Staying on top of a roof," one Twitter user posted, followed by an address. "Please help BORRES FAMILY w/ 2y/o child!!," posted another.

Deep water in many parts of metropolitan Manila blocked roads, stranded cars and flooded homes.

In several areas, the water was waist deep or higher, the Metropolitan Manila Development Authority said in its Twitter feed.

In an effort to save lives and make way for rescue and relief efforts, government offices and schools were closed Tuesday and Wednesday, the office of President Benigno Aquino said. Some schools will remain closed Thursday, PNA reported.

Work was also suspended at private offices around the capital region Tuesday.

The national railroad called off services, and many roads were under water. Some dams were beginning to overflow, putting more communities at risk, the authorities said.

The country's weather service -- the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration -- warned residents to expect more landslides and flash flooding Wednesday, and the authorities urged residents in low-lying areas to move to higher ground.

The latest deaths came on top of the 53 people who had already been killed across the Philippines by heavy wind and rain in the past few weeks.

The rain and flooding are the result of the normal summer monsoon enhanced by the effects of Tropical Storm Haikui, the Philippines weather service said. The storm made landfall on the east coast of China on Wednesday morning.

CNN iReporter Genhall Manua Chen in Shanghai, China, noticed the wind begin to pick up in the city around mid-morning local time, before the deluge from Tropical Storm Haikui began.

"There was a lot of preparation. I went downstairs at 4 p.m. and emergency workers were draining the streets and doing their jobs with drainage and transportation safety," he said. "Folks walking around seemed unfazed, but cautious of the weather."

The Philippines had already been lashed by heavy rain and wind in recent weeks resulting from Tropical Storm Saola, which plowed past it before hitting Taiwan and China at the end of last week.

In December, Tropical Storm Washi left more than 1,200 people dead after it set off flash floods that swept away entire villages in the southern Philippines.

CNN's Alex Zolbert in Manila; Jethro Mullen and Anjali Tsui in Hong Kong; and Laura Smith-Spark and Sarah Brown in London contributed to this report.

MLK Breakfast 2023

Photos from The Skanner Foundation's 37th Annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Breakfast.