09-29-2022  5:25 am   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Tiny Oregon Town Hosts 1st Wind-Solar-Battery 'Hybrid' Plant

A renewable energy plant being commissioned in Oregon combines solar power, wind power and massive batteries to store the energy generated there is the first utility-scale plant of its kind in North America.

State Senator Weighs in on Lottery Issues

Sen. James Manning of Eugene voices concerns about the Lottery’s special treatment of two of its managers

Oregon Gubernatorial Candidates Clash Over Guns, Abortion

Three candidates clashed over gun control, abortions and the homeless crisis, just six weeks before election day.

Black United Fund Launches Emerging Entrepreneur Program

Pilot program will support promising small business owner ready to take the next step.

NEWS BRIEFS

Council Approves Dunn’s Proposal to Expand Hate Crime Reporting System

The King County Council approved legislation that will create a new community-based Stop Hate Hotline and online portal, expanding...

Expiring Protections: 10-Day Notices of Nonpayment of Rent And "Safe Harbor" Protections

Effective October 1, a Landlord will be able to resume use of a 72-hour notice or 144-hour notice when issuing a termination notice...

11 Area Post Offices to Host Hiring Events

Over 100 Northwest USPS Hosting Job Fairs ...

Rep. Janelle Bynum Champions Oregon Business and Sets Sights on Strengthening Key Industries

Rep. Bynum invited leaders and experts to discuss ways the state can champion businesses of all sizes, expand broadband, bolster the...

PPS Renames Headquarters

The central office will be named after Matthew Prophet, Portland Public School's first Black Superintendent from 1982-1992,...

1st civil trial over Portland cops’ use of force begins

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — The first civil suit alleging Portland police used excessive violence against a 2020 racial justice demonstrator opened Tuesday before a jury in Multnomah County Circuit Court. Civil rights attorneys are paying close attention because the outcome could answer...

Seattle Children’s emergency room sees unprecedented demand

SEATTLE (AP) — Seattle Children’s Hospital is seeing “unprecedented demand” in its emergency department, resulting in longer wait times and providers seeing some patients in the waiting room, officials said this week. Seattle Children’s Emergency Medicine medical director...

Auburn loses 2nd center, Tate Johnson, to injury

AUBURN, Ala. (AP) — Auburn has lost its second center of the season with Tate Johnson slated for surgery on his left elbow. Tigers coach Bryan Harsin said Monday that Johnson is scheduled for surgery on the elbow Thursday and is expected to miss 6-8 weeks but could be out for the...

LSU survives Daniels' injury scare in romp over New Mexico

BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — The LSU defense held New Mexico to 88 total yards and the Tigers survived an injury scare to starting quarterback Jayden Daniels in a 38-0 victory Saturday night at Tiger Stadium. “Once is an accident, twice is a coincidence, three times is a habit,” LSU...

OPINION

No Room for Black Folk

A recent interview with Dr. Ebony Elizabeth Thomas and an associate professor, reveals the inability of certain white Americans to share the benefits of our society ...

The Cruelty of Exploiting Vulnerable People for Political Advantage

There is always a new low for Trump Republicans. And that is pretty frightening. ...

The Military to American Youth: You Belong to Me

The U.S. military needs more than just money in its annual budget. It needs access to America’s young people as well — their wallets, their bodies, and their minds. ...

Financial Fairness at Risk With Proposed TD Bank-First Horizon Merger

As banks grow larger through mergers and focus on growing online and mobile services, serious concerns emerge on how fair and how accessible banking will be to traditionally underserved Black and Latino communities. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Latvian election shadowed by division among ethnic Russians

HELSINKI (AP) — Latvians will be voting on Saturday in a general election that has been substantially influenced by neighboring Russia’s attack on Ukraine, political disintegration among the Baltic country’s sizable ethnic-Russian minority as well as issues relating to the economy, including...

Trial of elderly Rwanda genocide suspect opens at UN court

THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) — A frail 87-year-old Rwandan accused of encouraging and bankrolling the country's 1994 genocide boycotted the opening of his trial at a United Nations tribunal Thursday, nearly three decades after the 100-day massacre left 800,000 dead. Félicien Kabuga...

Biden, Harris to attend Jackson's Supreme Court investiture

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden, Vice President Kamala Harris and their spouses will attend the ceremonial investiture for Justice Ketanji Brown Jackson, the Supreme Court’s newest member and its first Black female justice, a White House official said. The appearance of...

ENTERTAINMENT

Billy Eichner made a great rom-com. Now its audiences' turn.

NEW YORK (AP) — At the Toronto International Film Festival world premiere of “Bros,” Billy Eichner exhorted the crowd to keep cheering. “Keep it going!” implored Eichner. “I want a longer ovation than ‘The Whale! ’” In the whistle-stop lead-up to the...

Model fearing Myanmar military heads to asylum in Canada

BANGKOK (AP) — A fashion model from Myanmar who feared being arrested by the country's military government if she was forced back home from exile has arrived in Canada, which she says has granted her asylum. Thaw Nandar Aung, also known as Han Lay, left on a flight from Bangkok’s...

Review: Keith Jarrett at his peak on ‘Bordeaux Concert’

“Bordeaux Concert,” Keith Jarrett (ECM Records) When Keith Jarrett gently strikes the final note on the opening piece of “Bordeaux Concert,” 15 seconds pass before concertgoers begin to applaud, taking time to savor what they just heard. New music from our...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Suu Kyi convicted again, Australian economist gets 3 years

BANGKOK (AP) — A court in military-ruled Myanmar convicted former leader Aung San Suu Kyi in another criminal...

Climate Migration: Blind and homeless amid Somalia's drought

DOLLOW, Somalia (AP) — Blindness heightens the remaining senses. The thud of a toppling camel is more jarring,...

Welfare group reports severe breaches on Romanian fur farms

SIGHISOARA, Romania (AP) — In a dingy basement, chinchillas bred to provide the fashion industry with their fur...

US candidate to lead UN telecoms agency after US-Russia race

BUCHAREST, Romania (AP) — Doreen Bogdan-Martin of the United States was elected Thursday to head the U.N.’s...

3 million children may miss a semester in flood-hit Pakistan

ISLAMABAD (AP) — Almost 3 million children in Pakistan may miss at least one semester because of flood damage to...

Iraq summons Iranian ambassador after drone bombing campaign

BAGHDAD (AP) — Iraq summoned the Iranian ambassador on Thursday to deliver a diplomatic complaint following a...

By Laura Smith-Spark CNN

China, the United States and three Middle Eastern nations carried out the most executions last year, rights group Amnesty International said Wednesday, but a global trend toward ending the death penalty persisted.There were at least 682 confirmed executions worldwide last year, two more than in 2011, according to the group.

China is believed to have executed several thousand people last year, Amnesty said, but government secrecy makes it impossible to confirm exact numbers.

"The lack of reliable data does not allow Amnesty International to publish credible figures for the use of the death penalty in the country," the rights group said. "However, available information strongly indicates that China carries out more executions than the rest of the world put together."

Iran carried out at least 314 executions last year, Iraq at least 129 and Saudi Arabia at least 79. In the United States, 43 people were executed across nine states. Sixth on the list was Yemen, with at least 28 executions.

"Methods of executions included beheading, hanging, firing squad and lethal injection," Amnesty International said. "In Saudi Arabia, the body of one man executed through beheading was displayed in a public 'crucifixion' display."

According to the 60-page report, "Death Sentences and Executions in 2012," there were at least 1,722 newly-imposed death sentences in 58 countries last year, compared with 1,923 in 63 countries in 2011.

This meant that at least 23,386 people were under sentence of death worldwide at the end of 2012, it said.

 

'Cruel and inhumane punishment'

In Africa, two countries -- Benin and Ghana -- are on their way to abolishing the death penalty. In nearby Sierra Leone, there are no prisoners on death row.

However, a surge in executions in Gambia, which had not carried out the death penalty in almost three decades but executed nine people in August, and 19 executions in Sudan pushed figures for the continent up, the rights group said.

Three countries in the Asia-Pacific region -- Japan, Pakistan and India -- also resumed executions after a hiatus, Amnesty International said.

The number of executions in the Middle East last year, almost all of them in Iran, Iraq, Saudi Arabia and Yemen, was "a cause of great concern," it said. The tally almost doubled in Iraq from the previous year, when 68 people were put to death.

The conflict in Syria made it impossible for researchers to establish whether capital punishment was carried out, it added.

Amnesty International Secretary General Salil Shetty said the "regression" seen in some countries last year was disappointing -- but that it did not change the overall trend.

"In many parts of the world, executions are becoming a thing of the past. Only one in 10 countries in the world carries out executions," he said.

"Their leaders should ask themselves why they are still applying a cruel and inhumane punishment that the rest of the world is leaving behind."

There is no evidence that the death penalty works as a special deterrent against crime, Shetty said.

"The real reason for the death penalty's use can often be found elsewhere. In 2012, we were once again very concerned to see countries executing for what appeared to be political purposes -- either as a populist measure, or as an outright tool of repression."

 

Texas leads executions

In the United States, the number of executions and death sentences remained steady compared with 2011, but the number of states carrying out capital punishment continues to drop, according to the Death Penalty Information Center.

Forty-three men were put to death in 2012, matching 2011's total, it said. Eighty people were sentenced to death, the second lowest total since executions resumed in 1976.

Only nine of the 50 states carried out lethal injections of convicted capital murderers, led by Texas with 15 executions, more than a third of the nationwide total for 2012.

Connecticut became the 17th state to abolish the death penalty in April last year. California narrowly approved keeping capital punishment in a November referendum.

The state has by far the nation's largest death row population at 727 inmates, but has not carried out an execution since 2005, over continuing legal challenges to the lethal injection procedures.

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