09-29-2022  9:12 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Tiny Oregon Town Hosts 1st Wind-Solar-Battery 'Hybrid' Plant

A renewable energy plant being commissioned in Oregon combines solar power, wind power and massive batteries to store the energy generated there is the first utility-scale plant of its kind in North America.

State Senator Weighs in on Lottery Issues

Sen. James Manning of Eugene voices concerns about the Lottery’s special treatment of two of its managers

Oregon Gubernatorial Candidates Clash Over Guns, Abortion

Three candidates clashed over gun control, abortions and the homeless crisis, just six weeks before election day.

Black United Fund Launches Emerging Entrepreneur Program

Pilot program will support promising small business owner ready to take the next step.

NEWS BRIEFS

1st Civil Trial Over Portland Cops’ Use of Force Begins

Civil rights attorneys are paying close attention because the outcome could answer questions about the potential liability the city...

Council Approves Dunn’s Proposal to Expand Hate Crime Reporting System

The King County Council approved legislation that will create a new community-based Stop Hate Hotline and online portal, expanding...

Expiring Protections: 10-Day Notices of Nonpayment of Rent And "Safe Harbor" Protections

Effective October 1, a Landlord will be able to resume use of a 72-hour notice or 144-hour notice when issuing a termination notice...

11 Area Post Offices to Host Hiring Events

Over 100 Northwest USPS Hosting Job Fairs ...

Rep. Janelle Bynum Champions Oregon Business and Sets Sights on Strengthening Key Industries

Rep. Bynum invited leaders and experts to discuss ways the state can champion businesses of all sizes, expand broadband, bolster the...

Bodies and floatplane parts recovered from Puget Sound

SEATTLE (AP) — The bodies of some of the 10 victims and most of a floatplane that crashed in Washington state’s Puget Sound earlier this month have been recovered. Island County Emergency Management confirmed Thursday that multiple bodies were recovered, but Deputy Director Eric...

Endangered southern resident orca numbers drop from 74 to 73

SEATTLE (AP) — The population of endangered southern resident orcas has declined from 74 to 73 in the latest census, according to the Center for Whale Research. The center posted on Facebook this week that it had completed its annual census estimate of the southern resident killer...

No. 1 Georgia will try to get ground game going at Missouri

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — Georgia has one of college football's prolific offenses, triggered by one of its best quarterbacks, so of course the topic of conversation around Athens as the top-ranked Bulldogs head to Missouri on Saturday would be their run game. That's what happens when...

No. 1 Georgia heads back on road to face reeling Missouri

No. 1 Georgia (4-0, 1-0 SEC) at Missouri (2-2, 0-1), Saturday, 7:30 p.m. ET (SEC Network) Line: Georgia by 28, according to FanDuel Sportsbook. Series record: Georgia leads 10-1. WHAT’S AT STAKE? Georgia looked vulnerable for the first time...

OPINION

No Room for Black Folk

A recent interview with Dr. Ebony Elizabeth Thomas and an associate professor, reveals the inability of certain white Americans to share the benefits of our society ...

The Cruelty of Exploiting Vulnerable People for Political Advantage

There is always a new low for Trump Republicans. And that is pretty frightening. ...

The Military to American Youth: You Belong to Me

The U.S. military needs more than just money in its annual budget. It needs access to America’s young people as well — their wallets, their bodies, and their minds. ...

Financial Fairness at Risk With Proposed TD Bank-First Horizon Merger

As banks grow larger through mergers and focus on growing online and mobile services, serious concerns emerge on how fair and how accessible banking will be to traditionally underserved Black and Latino communities. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Civil rights lawyer John Burris confronts police narratives

OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — Before John Burris became the go-to lawyer for Northern California families grieving a loved one killed by police, the civil rights legend was a child suspicious of the Santa Claus narrative. He didn't understand why Santa was white. He was confused by Santa's...

Sheriff probed after comments surface condemning Black staff

WHITEVILLE, N.C. (AP) — A North Carolina sheriff was recorded calling Black employees by derogatory names and saying they should be fired, a television station reported. Several Black officers in leadership positions were later demoted or fired. Columbus County Sheriff Jody Greene...

Russia to annex more of Ukraine on Friday at the Kremlin

KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — Russia planned to annex more of Ukraine on Friday in an escalation of the seven-month war that was expected to isolate the Kremlin further, draw more international punishment and bring Ukraine extra military, political and economic support. The annexation —...

ENTERTAINMENT

Do the 'Time Warp' again — 'Rocky Horror' show will travel

NEW YORK (AP) — Grab your toilet paper. Bring a flashlight. Don't forget a newspaper — or your fishnets. A touring, interactive version of “The Rocky Horror Picture Show” is hitting the road to celebrate the cult film's birthday with screenings, live shadow casts, the...

Katie Couric says she's been treated for breast cancer

NEW YORK (AP) — Katie Couric said Wednesday that she'd been diagnosed with breast cancer, and underwent surgery and radiation treatment this summer to treat the tumor. Couric, who memorably was tested for colon cancer on the “Today” show in 2000, announced her diagnosis in an...

Review: 'Smile' turns twisted grin into bland horror flick

I have mostly frowny faces for “Smile,” a bluntly unsettling and blandly grim new horror flick that wrings as much mileage as it can out of a twisted grin. Parker Finn’s directorial debut, which opens in theaters Friday, adapts his own 11-minute short into a jump scare-rich...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Asian stocks sink on German inflation, British tax cuts

BEIJING (AP) — Asian stocks sank again Friday after German inflation spiked higher, British Prime Minister Liz...

'Crown,' 'Interview With the Vampire' among TV highlights

LOS ANGELES (AP) — What’s fall got to do with the fall TV season? Summer had yet to roll up its Labor Day...

GOP states sue Biden administration over student loan plan

WASHINGTON (AP) — Six Republican-led states are suing the Biden administration in an effort to halt its plan to...

Live Updates: Russia-Ukraine War

KIYV, Ukraine (AP) — WASHINGTON — President Joe Biden is denouncing the referendums underpinning Russia’s...

Climate Migration: Blind and homeless amid Somalia's drought

DOLLOW, Somalia (AP) — Blindness heightens the remaining senses. The thud of a toppling camel is more jarring,...

3 Russian cosmonauts return safely from Intl Space Station

MOSCOW (AP) — Three Russian cosmonauts returned safely Thursday from a mission to the International Space...

By Dana Ford CNN






Self-defense or murder?

That's the question at the heart of the trial of George Zimmerman, a neighborhood watch volunteer who killed 17-year-old Trayvon Martin.

Monday marked the start of jury selection in Seminole County, Florida, where Martin was fatally shot on February 26, 2012.

The shooting put a national spotlight on Zimmerman's hometown of Sanford and sparked fresh debates about race relations and gun laws in America.

Zimmerman is Hispanic; Martin was African-American.

An initial decision not to pursue charges against Zimmerman led to the dismissal of the town's police chief and the appointment of a special prosecutor, who accused the neighborhood watch volunteer of unjustly profiling and killing Martin.

Zimmerman now faces a second-degree murder charge in Martin's death. He has pleaded not guilty and is currently free on $1 million bond.

"We don't need you to do that"

Prosecutors and defense attorneys agree on almost nothing about what happened that day.

What's clear so far is this: Martin left the home of his father's girlfriend in Sanford to get a snack at a nearby convenience store.

As he walked back, carrying some candy and a soft drink, he and Zimmerman crossed paths.

Earlier, Zimmerman had called 911 to report a suspicious person in the neighborhood.

A recording of that call includes a police dispatcher asking the volunteer, "Are you following him?"

"Yeah," Zimmerman replied.

"OK, we don't need you to do that," the dispatcher said.

Zimmerman says he killed Martin, who was wearing a hoodie, in self-defense after the teen punched him and slammed his head on the sidewalk.

He suffered a fractured nose and cuts to the back of his head, according to a medical report by Zimmerman's family doctor.

Sanford police initially questioned Zimmerman and released him without charges. They said then there were no grounds to disprove his account that he'd acted to protect himself.

The case soon became the center of a national controversy, which continues some 16 months later, though at a lower intensity.

His family has said Zimmerman profiled the teen and crossed the line from neighborhood watch volunteer to vigilante.

Benjamin Crump, an attorney for Martin's family, has gone further, accusing Zimmerman of murdering Martin "in cold blood."

"In the fight of his life"

According to Crump, Martin was on the phone with his 16-year-old girlfriend shortly before the shooting.

The girl, who wishes to remain anonymous, says she heard someone ask Martin what he was doing and heard Martin ask why the person was following him.

She then got the impression there was an altercation, during which an earpiece fell out of Martin's ear and the connection went dead, Crump said.

Neighbors reported hearing gunfire.

Zimmerman recently waived his right to a pretrial hearing under Florida's "stand your ground" law, which allows people to use deadly force when threatened regardless of where they are.

His lawyers will claim self-defense. Zimmerman himself could testify at trial.

Defense attorney Mark O'Mara said he has no imminent plans to ask for a change of venue and would only do so if lawyers can't select a suitable jury.

As jury selection began Monday, 21 potential jurors were brought into the courtroom. Four of them -- three women and one man -- were interviewed individually by attorneys, but there were no indications how either side felt about any of the potential jurors.

From that group of 21, one person was dismissed. The same group of 20 will be back on Tuesday for more individual questioning.

"If we can pick a jury in Seminole County, this is where the incident occurred and this is where the case should be decided," O'Mara told HLN's Jean Casarez.

He also said the George Zimmerman defense fund has raised $85,000 in the past week and a half.

Media coverage of the case is expected to be intense.

The case garnered so much attention that about a month after the shooting, President Barack Obama spoke about it, saying the shooting required "soul-searching."

Zimmerman's brother, Robert, has called on the state to drop the charges.

"George lived in a community plagued by crime and was the first to come forward to help his neighbors," Robert Zimmerman said last month.

"George is a good, decent and honest man. It is now my honor to advocate for him. George is in the fight of his life quite literally."

Authorities initially "did their job when they refused to charge someone with a crime who committed no crime," he said.

"In this country, you don't charge someone why any crime solely to assuage the concerns of the misinformed masses."

CNN's Vivian Kuo and HLNtv.com's Colette Bennett contributed to this report.

 

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