02-02-2023  11:40 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Hundreds of Portland City Workers on Strike for Better Pay

Workers represented by the union Laborers’ Local 483 have been without a contract since June. Negotiations over a new four-year deal broke down in December

Washington State Gov. Inslee Tests Positive for COVID-19

He plans to continue working. Trudi Inslee, the first spouse, has tested negative.

Oregon BIPOC Caucus Calls for Action to Support Victims of Gun Violence

The Legislative Black, Indigenous, People of Color (BIPOC) Caucus has released the following statement in response to the tragedy at Half Moon Bay, CA that left seven dead and one person wounded, all of whom were people of color

Democrats Voice Priorities for Coming Year in the Capitol

Highlights from the Democrats 2023 legislative agenda. 

NEWS BRIEFS

The Seattle Public Library's Homework Help Program Expands to Eight Locations and Increases Hours

Homework Help, The Seattle Public Library’s free after school tutoring service, will add two locations and increase hours in...

County Seeks Community Needs Survey Responses From Residents

Clark County Community Services is asking residents who are low-income to complete a survey to help determine what resources and...

"Meet Me at Higo" Opens in the Level 8 Gallery of The Seattle Public Library's Central Library

The traveling exhibit from the Wing Luke Museum tells a fascinating community and family history about Seattle’s Japantown ...

NAACP Portland Calls for Justice With Community Prayer Vigil

Community leaders will hold a prayer vigil Tuesday, Jan. 31 at noon, to reflect on the tragic brutality that led to the death of Tyre...

Oregon State Celebrates Black History Month With a Series of Events

Free events highlight the achievements and perseverance of Black and African American communities from the past to the present. ...

Inside the hunt for a serial kidnapper, and a bloody finale

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — Police in rural southwest Oregon were on high alert: A man with a history of kidnapping and torturing women in two states was on the run in their territory. When a tip came in from a cab company that had given him a ride, they went house-to-house to check on...

Suspect in standoff with Oregon police, most lockdowns ended

HOOD RIVER, Ore. (AP) — Gunshots broke out as police in Hood River, Oregon, responded to a call at a home in the scenic vacation town, prompting an hourslong lockdown of schools and businesses Thursday. The suspect was in a house surrounded by law enforcement as of 2:30 p.m., the...

Penn, DeVries lead Drake to 88-81 2OT win over N. Iowa

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — Roman Penn scored 28 points and distributed six assists and Drake pulled off a dramatic 88-81 double overtime win again Northern Iowa on Wednesday night. The Bulldogs overcame a career-high tying, 30-point effort from Bowen Born who made a 3-pointer at the...

Brown's near perfect shooting effort sends Missouri past LSU

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Kobe Brown scored 26 points on 10-for-11 shooting and Noah Carter scored 14 points and Missouri won its third straight, beating LSU 87-77 on Wednesday night. Brown tied his career high with 10-made shots having accomplished the feat twice before. Reserve Deandre...

OPINION

Unaffordable Rental Costs Now Plague 44 Million People in Every State Economic Inequality Places Most Risk of Eviction on Blacks and the Poor

For the first time in more than two decades of research, every state now has renters who are nearing a financial breaking point in housing affordability. ...

The Beating and Murder of Mr. Tyre Nichols, A Black Man

Time to Abolish the Criminal Injustice System ...

It's Time to Irrigate the Fallow Ground of Minority Media Ownership

In 2023, one aspect of civil rights and racial justice that barely remains addressed is racial inclusion in media ownership. ...

A Letter to Residents of N. and N.E. Portland from Commissioner Susheela Jayapal

Susheela Jayapal, Multnomah County Commissioner for District 2, North and Northeast Portland, reviews her first four-year term and looks forward to her second term ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

DeSantis eyes 2024 from afar as GOP rivals move toward runs

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis may be months away from publicly declaring his presidential intentions, but his potential rivals aren't holding back. No fewer than a half dozen Republicans eyeing the White House have begun actively courting top political operatives...

At Nichols' funeral, Black America's grief on public display

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) — The sound of the djembe drums started as a low tremble and grew more distinct as the musicians drew closer to the hundreds gathered inside the Memphis church. “We love you, Tyre,” the drummers chanted, referring to Tyre Nichols, a 29-year-old Black man...

Arkansas Gov. Sanders to give GOP response to Biden address

WASHINGTON (AP) — Arkansas Gov. Sarah Huckabee Sanders will deliver the Republican address to the nation in response to President Joe Biden's State of the Union speech next week as the GOP seeks to show it's creating a new generation of leaders. House Speaker Kevin McCarthy and...

ENTERTAINMENT

Colin Quinn's new show highlights the art of 'Small Talk'

NEW YORK (AP) — When asked in a recent interview if he’ll always want to do stand-up, Colin Quinn joked that he’s tired and can't do it forever. Then the 63-year-old comedian launched into the “magic” he feels onstage when getting a laugh, and sheepishly admitted he’ll probably never...

Grammys to honor Loretta Lynn, Takeoff, McVie

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The Grammys will pay homage to lives of Loretta Lynn, Migos rapper Takeoff and Christine McVie with star-studded performances during Sunday's ceremony. The Recording Academy announced Wednesday that the ceremony will honor the three musicians who died last year...

Review: 'Knock at the Cabin' twists the home invasion horror

Knock. Knock. It being mid-winter (typically a doldrums in movie theaters), it's a cozy relief to be able to throw open the door and find M. Night Shyamalan standing there with his near-annual helping of high-concept thriller. His last one, “Old,” about vacationers trapped on a...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Psychedelic churches in US pushing boundaries of religion

HILDALE, Utah (AP) — The tea tasted bitter and earthy, but Lorenzo Gonzales drank it anyway. On that frigid...

Israel probes legality of US giving artifact to Palestinians

BETHLEHEM, West Bank (AP) — An ivory spoon dating back 2,700 years that was recently repatriated to the...

Chill pervades China's tech firms even as crackdown eases

HONG KONG (AP) — A grinding crackdown that wiped billions of dollars of value off Chinese technology companies...

Putin invokes Stalingrad battle as justifying Ukraine fight

MOSCOW (AP) — Russian President Vladimir Putin on Thursday marked the 80th anniversary of the World War II...

Military places restive areas of Myanmar under martial law

BANGKOK (AP) — Martial law was declared in several areas of military-run Myanmar on Thursday, a day after...

Extremist Israeli group halts fund-raising effort in US

LAKEWOOD, N.J. (AP) — An Israeli group that assists Jewish prisoners convicted in some of the country’s most...

By Deborah Feyerick and Lateef Mungin CNN







Abu Anas al LibiAn alleged al Qaeda operative accused of playing a role in the 1998 U.S. Embassy bombings in Kenya and Tanzania pleaded not guilty Tuesday to terrorism charges brought against him in federal court in New York.As Abu Anas al Libi walked into court to face the charges, his hands were shackled, his hair was short, and he sported a red, bushy beard, graying around his face and chin. He moved slowly and appeared unsteady. He told the court he was 49, but he looked 10 to 15 years older. His family told CNN he suffers from hepatitis C. Judge Lewis Kaplan signed a medical order for care.

Wearing gray sweatpants, a black, long-sleeved shirt and black flip-flops with beige socks, al Libi walked from the holding area into the stately wood-paneled courtroom.

In response to a question from Kaplan, al Libi said he preferred to be addressed by his proper name, Nazih Abdul Hamed al Ruqai.

 

Abu Anas al Libi is the name he was known by within al Qaeda. Al Libi means "from Libya."

Al Libi answered the few questions posed to him by Kaplan through a translator. "Yes," he said, he understood the charges against him; and "No, I can't," he said, when asked if he could afford a lawyer.

He will be appointed a Criminal Justice Act attorney trained in handling federal terrorism cases. He is being held without bail, since Kaplan agreed with prosecutors that he poses a flight risk and is a danger the community.

That lawyer, David Patton, issued a statement Tuesday stressing that "the presumption of innocence is not a small technicality here."

Patton notes his client is mentioned in the 150-page indictment "in a mere three paragraphs relating to conduct in 1993 and 1994 and nothing since." In those paragraphs, authorities allege al Libi met with al Qaeda members about bombing the U.S. Embassy in Kenya, which ended up happening five years later in 1998.

"There is no allegation that he had any connection to al Qaeda after 1994," Patton said, "and he is eager to move forward with the legal process in this case."

U.S. Army Delta Force soldiers seized him on October 5 from outside his house in Tripoli, Libya.

U.S. officials say he was taken initially to a Navy ship for questioning before he was brought to the United States over the weekend.

Prosecutors say he worked as a senior aide to Osama bin Laden during al Qaeda's formative years. Among the charges, he is accused of taking photos of the U.S. Embassy in Nairobi in preparation for the attack. A truck bomb detonated, destroying a nearby building and killing more than 200 people, among them a handful of embassy employees. A second coordinated attack on the U.S. Embassy in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania, took place at virtually the same time on August 7,1998, killing embassy personnel there.

His arrival in the U.S. has reopened a debate over whether international terrorist suspects should be tried in U.S. courts.

U.S. Rep. Peter King, R-New York, said Monday that it was "unfortunate" that al Libi was on U.S. soil.

"It shows the inherent flaws in the U.S. policy decision to try in the U.S., because once you arrive on U.S. soil, that ends the interrogation of these high-value detainees," King said. He added that that wouldn't have happened had al Libi been sent to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and faced a military commission there.

 

U.S. or military court

President Barack Obama and Attorney General Eric Holder have previously said they prefer to try people such as al Libi in American courts.

In 2009, Holder said five detainees with alleged ties to the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks would be transferred from Guantanamo Bay to New York for trial in civilian court.

Holder then reversed course, announcing that accused 9/11 mastermind Khalid Sheikh Mohammed and others would be tried by a military commission at Guantanamo.

Al Libi was indicted in 2001 by the federal court in the Southern District of New York in the embassy bombings and in connection with his alleged roles in al Qaeda conspiracies to attack U.S. forces in Saudi Arabia, Yemen and Somalia.

State Department deputy spokeswoman Marie Harf said last week that there was no chance that al Libi would end up at Guantanamo.

"The administration's position on Guantanamo is clear: Our goal is not to add to the population, it's to reduce it, which we've done," she said. "Our policy is not to send any new detainees to Guantanamo."

Family wants a lawyer

Al Libi's family members said they had received no news about him from the U.S. or Libyan governments and were shocked to learn that he had arrived in the United States.

His son, Abdullah, said the family hoped to get a lawyer who would "work with him, for him."

"We don't want him talking to just anyone," Abdullah said. "We don't want just any lawyer asking him questions."

Some terrorism experts have questioned how much valuable intelligence al Libi would be able to provide. A former jihadist associate told CNN last week that it was unlikely that he still had an active role with the terrorist network.

His wife said he was no longer a member of al Qaeda, had a normal life and was seeking a job with the Libyan Oil Ministry.

A U.S. official said al Libi received care at a medical facility in New York for a pre-existing medical condition and is "doing better."

The official did not detail the medical issue. His wife told CNN this month that al Libi has a severe case of hepatitis C and that she was worried about his health.

The Libyan government has protested that it hasn't been able to see al Libi yet, in accordance with international law that allows countries to stay in contact with their citizens who are accused of a crime in a foreign nation. A senior Obama administration official said it wasn't possible to give Libya consular access to al Libi until he had arrived in the United States.

"We have every intention of allowing this; it just hasn't happened yet," the official said.

Al Libi is set to return to court on October 22 at 4:30 p.m.

 

Journalist Ayman al-Kekli in Tripoli and CNN's Bill Mears, Elise Labott, Nic Robertson, Evan Perez and Susan Candiotti contributed to this report.

 

MLK Breakfast 2023

Photos from The Skanner Foundation's 37th Annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Breakfast.