09-29-2022  8:16 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Tiny Oregon Town Hosts 1st Wind-Solar-Battery 'Hybrid' Plant

A renewable energy plant being commissioned in Oregon combines solar power, wind power and massive batteries to store the energy generated there is the first utility-scale plant of its kind in North America.

State Senator Weighs in on Lottery Issues

Sen. James Manning of Eugene voices concerns about the Lottery’s special treatment of two of its managers

Oregon Gubernatorial Candidates Clash Over Guns, Abortion

Three candidates clashed over gun control, abortions and the homeless crisis, just six weeks before election day.

Black United Fund Launches Emerging Entrepreneur Program

Pilot program will support promising small business owner ready to take the next step.

NEWS BRIEFS

1st Civil Trial Over Portland Cops’ Use of Force Begins

Civil rights attorneys are paying close attention because the outcome could answer questions about the potential liability the city...

Council Approves Dunn’s Proposal to Expand Hate Crime Reporting System

The King County Council approved legislation that will create a new community-based Stop Hate Hotline and online portal, expanding...

Expiring Protections: 10-Day Notices of Nonpayment of Rent And "Safe Harbor" Protections

Effective October 1, a Landlord will be able to resume use of a 72-hour notice or 144-hour notice when issuing a termination notice...

11 Area Post Offices to Host Hiring Events

Over 100 Northwest USPS Hosting Job Fairs ...

Rep. Janelle Bynum Champions Oregon Business and Sets Sights on Strengthening Key Industries

Rep. Bynum invited leaders and experts to discuss ways the state can champion businesses of all sizes, expand broadband, bolster the...

Bodies and floatplane parts recovered from Puget Sound

SEATTLE (AP) — The bodies of some of the 10 victims and most of a floatplane that crashed in Washington state’s Puget Sound earlier this month have been recovered. Island County Emergency Management confirmed Thursday that multiple bodies were recovered, but Deputy Director Eric...

Endangered southern resident orca numbers drop from 74 to 73

SEATTLE (AP) — The population of endangered southern resident orcas has declined from 74 to 73 in the latest census, according to the Center for Whale Research. The center posted on Facebook this week that it had completed its annual census estimate of the southern resident killer...

No. 1 Georgia will try to get ground game going at Missouri

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — Georgia has one of college football's prolific offenses, triggered by one of its best quarterbacks, so of course the topic of conversation around Athens as the top-ranked Bulldogs head to Missouri on Saturday would be their run game. That's what happens when...

No. 1 Georgia heads back on road to face reeling Missouri

No. 1 Georgia (4-0, 1-0 SEC) at Missouri (2-2, 0-1), Saturday, 7:30 p.m. ET (SEC Network) Line: Georgia by 28, according to FanDuel Sportsbook. Series record: Georgia leads 10-1. WHAT’S AT STAKE? Georgia looked vulnerable for the first time...

OPINION

No Room for Black Folk

A recent interview with Dr. Ebony Elizabeth Thomas and an associate professor, reveals the inability of certain white Americans to share the benefits of our society ...

The Cruelty of Exploiting Vulnerable People for Political Advantage

There is always a new low for Trump Republicans. And that is pretty frightening. ...

The Military to American Youth: You Belong to Me

The U.S. military needs more than just money in its annual budget. It needs access to America’s young people as well — their wallets, their bodies, and their minds. ...

Financial Fairness at Risk With Proposed TD Bank-First Horizon Merger

As banks grow larger through mergers and focus on growing online and mobile services, serious concerns emerge on how fair and how accessible banking will be to traditionally underserved Black and Latino communities. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Sheriff probed after comments surface condemning Black staff

WHITEVILLE, N.C. (AP) — A North Carolina sheriff was recorded calling Black employees by derogatory names and saying they should be fired, a television station reported. Several Black officers in leadership positions were later demoted or fired. Columbus County Sheriff Jody Greene...

Russia to annex more of Ukraine on Friday at the Kremlin

KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — Russia planned to annex more of Ukraine on Friday in an escalation of the seven-month war that was expected to isolate the Kremlin further, draw more international punishment and bring Ukraine extra military, political and economic support. The annexation —...

Top leader of Episcopal Church tests positive for COVID-19

Michael Curry, the presiding bishop of the Episcopal Church, said Thursday that he had tested positive for COVID-19. Curry, who in 2015 became the first African American leader of the denomination, said he will participate in upcoming events either remotely or through pre-recorded...

ENTERTAINMENT

Do the 'Time Warp' again — 'Rocky Horror' show will travel

NEW YORK (AP) — Grab your toilet paper. Bring a flashlight. Don't forget a newspaper — or your fishnets. A touring, interactive version of “The Rocky Horror Picture Show” is hitting the road to celebrate the cult film's birthday with screenings, live shadow casts, the...

Katie Couric says she's been treated for breast cancer

NEW YORK (AP) — Katie Couric said Wednesday that she'd been diagnosed with breast cancer, and underwent surgery and radiation treatment this summer to treat the tumor. Couric, who memorably was tested for colon cancer on the “Today” show in 2000, announced her diagnosis in an...

Review: 'Smile' turns twisted grin into bland horror flick

I have mostly frowny faces for “Smile,” a bluntly unsettling and blandly grim new horror flick that wrings as much mileage as it can out of a twisted grin. Parker Finn’s directorial debut, which opens in theaters Friday, adapts his own 11-minute short into a jump scare-rich...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Wall Street drops back to lowest since 2020 as fear returns

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks fell broadly on Wall Street Thursday as worries about a possible recession and rising...

'Crown,' 'Interview With the Vampire' among TV highlights

LOS ANGELES (AP) — What’s fall got to do with the fall TV season? Summer had yet to roll up its Labor Day...

GOP states sue Biden administration over student loan plan

WASHINGTON (AP) — Six Republican-led states are suing the Biden administration in an effort to halt its plan to...

Live Updates: Russia-Ukraine War

KIYV, Ukraine (AP) — WASHINGTON — President Joe Biden is denouncing the referendums underpinning Russia’s...

Climate Migration: Blind and homeless amid Somalia's drought

DOLLOW, Somalia (AP) — Blindness heightens the remaining senses. The thud of a toppling camel is more jarring,...

3 Russian cosmonauts return safely from Intl Space Station

MOSCOW (AP) — Three Russian cosmonauts returned safely Thursday from a mission to the International Space...

By Eliott C. Mclaughlin CNN

Washington was billed as the national testing ground on the issue of genetically modified foods, which draws spirited supporters and detractors into the debate over their effects on human health and the environment.

If the state's vote tally is to be believed, it appears the Evergreen State won't get special labeling for GMO foods, as expected before the Tuesday vote.

Those in favor of the initiative, however, say don't count your genetically engineered chickens before they hatch, according to a news release that reads rather victoriously, considering the Washington secretary of state's office says the measure failed 55% to 45%.

"The campaign remains confident that a majority of Washington voters support labeling of genetically engineered foods, and optimistic about supporters getting out to vote in this off-year election," said the Yes on Initiative 522 release.

"For now, the votes are too close to call," reads the Yes on I-522 landing page. "Over the next few days more ballots will be counted and we will keep you posted as we learn more."

The secretary of state's website says 100% of the vote has been counted.

The vote, if confirmed, would mark a defeat for those who say GMO foods may pose health risks and lead to a spike in herbicide and pesticide usage. The Elway Poll in October reported that Washington voters were in favor of the initiative by four percentage points.

The vote would have made Washington the third state to require GMO labeling and the first to pass an initiative that will go into effect regardless of whether other states enact similar laws.

Placed on the ballot after Washington voters submitted more than 350,000 signatures, I-522 "would require most raw agricultural commodities, processed foods, and seeds and seed stocks, if produced using genetic engineering as defined, to be labeled as genetically engineered when offered for retail sale."

Yes on I-522 says it is "motivated by a very simple principle: People have the right to know what's in the food they eat and feed their families."

Sixty-four countries have passed laws allowing consumers to know when there are GMO ingredients in their food, according to the Center for Food Safety. The watchdog group says the "limited data" on GMO foods indicates that the foods lead to higher risks of "toxicity, allergenicity, antibiotic resistance and immune suppression."

Since genetically engineered foods entered the U.S. market, herbicide use on corn, soybeans and cotton has increased by 527 million pounds, the center said, citing a study by Environmental Science Europe.

Monsanto, a Missouri-based agricultural giant that was staunchly opposed to the measure, says on its website, GMOanswers.com, that the crops have led to lower pesticide usage. The company says it's also invested more than $100 million to ensure the products are safe.

"Humans, over our history, have altered all of our crops, often for taste or yield or disease resistance," the website says.

"Before they reach the market, crops from GM seeds are studied extensively to make sure they are safe for people, animals and the environment," the Monsanto site adds. "Today's GM products are the most researched and tested agricultural products in history."

Opponents spent more than $22 million to fight the legislation -- more than triple what those in favor of labeling spent -- with only $600 of that money coming from within the state. Monsanto contributed more than $5 million, the Washington Public Disclosure Commission said.

Twenty-three states have pending legislation regarding GMO labeling, according to the group Right to Know GMO. Maine and Connecticut in June passed laws requiring labeling, but they won't go into effect until other states pass GMO-labeling laws.

California last year shot down such a law with 51.4% of voters casting ballots against it.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service approved a non-GMO label for meat and liquid egg products in June, the first time the department has approved such a label from a third party. GMO foods were approved for human consumption in 1995, but the Food and Drug Administration never required any labels pointing them out as such.

CNN's Greg Botelho contributed to this report.

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