05-26-2024  11:55 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Oregon 2024 Primary Results

Maxine Dexter, Janelle Bynum, Dan Reyfield and Elizabeth Steiner secure nominations; other races too soon to call.

AP Decision Notes: What to Expect in Oregon's Primaries

Oregon has multiple hotly contested primaries upcoming, as well as some that will set the stage for high-profile races in November. Oregon's 5th Congressional District is home to one of the top Democratic primaries in the country.

Iconic Skanner Building Will Become Healing Space as The Skanner Continues Online

New owner strives to keep spirit of business intact during renovations.

No Criminal Charges in Rare Liquor Probe at OLCC, State Report Says

The investigation examined whether employees of the Oregon Liquor and Cannabis Commission improperly used their positions to obtain bottles of top-shelf bourbon for personal use.

NEWS BRIEFS

Portland Parks & Recreation’s Summer Free For All Returns for 2024

Parks Local Option Levy brings the city a full slate of free movies, concerts (including pop icon Sheila E), Free Lunch + Play, the...

GFO Library Open on Memorial Day

We are remaining open to give our patrons an opportunity to use the library on a day off from work. ...

Montavilla Jazz Festival Adds Concerts and Venues to Fall Festival

Festival features a three-day village-style celebration of local, world-class artistry with more than 30 concerts and events across 12...

Election Day Information in Multnomah County: Ballots Must Be Returned by 8 p.m. May 21

Today, May 21, 2024, is the last day to vote in the primary election. ...

PCC and Partners Break Ground on Affordable Housing

The new development, set to be a vibrant community hub, will feature 84 income-based apartments ...

Idaho drag performer awarded jumi.1 million in defamation case against far-right blogger

COEUR D'ALENE, Idaho (AP) — A jury has awarded more than jumi.1 million to an Idaho drag performer who accused a far-right blogger of defaming him when she falsely claimed that he exposed himself to a crowd, including children, during a Pride event in June 2022. The Kootenai County...

Ranked-choice voting has challenged the status quo. Its popularity will be tested in November

JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) — Alaska’s new election system — with open primaries and ranked voting — has been a model for those in other states who are frustrated by political polarization and a sense that voters lack real choice at the ballot box. Used for the first time in 2022, the...

Duke tops Missouri 4-3 in 9 innings to win first super regional, qualify for first WCWS

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — D'Auna Jennings led off the top of the ninth inning with a home run to end a scoreless pitching duel between Cassidy Curd and Missouri's Laurin Krings and 10th-seeded Duke held on for a wild 4-3 victory over the seventh-seeded Tigers on Sunday in the finale of the...

Mizzou uses combined 2-hitter to beat Duke 3-1 to force decisive game in Columbia Super Regional

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Laurin Krings and two relievers combined on a two-hitter and seventh-seeded Missouri forced a deciding game in the Columbia Super Regional with a 3-1 win over Duke on Saturday. The Tigers (48-17) had three-straight singles in the fourth inning, with Abby Hay...

OPINION

The Skanner News May 2024 Primary Endorsements

Read The Skanner News endorsements and vote today. Candidates for mayor and city council will appear on the November general election ballot. ...

Nation’s Growing Racial and Gender Wealth Gaps Need Policy Reform

Never-married Black women have 8 cents in wealth for every dollar held by while males. ...

New White House Plan Could Reduce or Eliminate Accumulated Interest for 30 Million Student Loan Borrowers

Multiple recent announcements from the Biden administration offer new hope for the 43.2 million borrowers hoping to get relief from the onerous burden of a collective

Op-Ed: Why MAGA Policies Are Detrimental to Black Communities

NNPA NEWSWIRE – MAGA proponents peddle baseless claims of widespread voter fraud to justify voter suppression tactics that disproportionately target Black voters. From restrictive voter ID laws to purging voter rolls to limiting early voting hours, these...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

South Africa's election could bring the biggest political shift since it became a democracy in 1994

CAPE TOWN, South Africa (AP) — South Africans will vote Wednesday to decide whether their country will take its most significant political step since the moment 30 years ago when it brought down apartheid and achieved democracy. This national election will not be as momentous as the...

National Spelling Bee reflects the economic success and cultural impact of immigrants from India

When Balu Natarajan became the first Indian American champion of the Scripps National Spelling Bee in 1985, a headline on an Associated Press article read, “Immigrants’ son wins National Spelling Bee,” with the first paragraph noting the champion “speaks his parents’ native Indian...

Pro-independence leader calls on protesters in New Caledonia to 'maintain resistance' against France

NICE, France (AP) — The leader of a pro-independence party in New Caledonia on Saturday called on supporters to “remain mobilized” across the French Pacific archipelago and “maintain resistance” against the Paris government's efforts to impose electoral reforms that the Indigenous Kanak...

ENTERTAINMENT

Drake leads the 2024 BET Awards nominations with 7, followed closely by Nicki Minaj

Drake is the leading nominee for next month's BET Awards, followed closely by Nicki Minaj. The Canadian rapper received seven nominations Thursday, including an album of the year nod for his eighth studio album, “For All the Dogs.” One of the awards he's up for is the music video...

Dabney Coleman, actor who specialized in curmudgeons, dies at 92

NEW YORK (AP) — Dabney Coleman, the mustachioed character actor who specialized in smarmy villains like the chauvinist boss in "9 to 5" and the nasty TV director in "Tootsie," has died. He was 92. Coleman died Thursday at his home in Santa Monica, his daughter, Quincy Coleman, said...

Book Review: 'Cujo' character returns as one of 12 stories in Stephen King’s ‘You Like It Darker'

In Stephen King’s world, “It” is a loaded word. It’s hard not to picture Pennywise the Clown haunting the sewers of Derry, Maine, of course, but in the horror writer’s newest collection of stories, “You Like It Darker,” “It” ranges from a suspicious stranger on a park bench, to an...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Military labs do the detective work to identify soldiers decades after they died in World War II

OFFUTT AIR FORCE BASE, Neb. (AP) — Generations of American families have grown up not knowing exactly what...

Nigeria is emerging as a critical mineral hub. The government is cracking down on illegal operations

ABUJA, Nigeria (AP) — Nigeria's government is cracking down on illegal mining, making dozens of arrests of...

Cyclone floods coastal villages, blows away thatched roofs and cuts power in Bangladesh and India

DHAKA, Bangladesh (AP) — A cyclone flooded coastal villages, blew away thatched roofs and left hundreds of...

North Korea plans to launch a rocket soon, likely carrying its 2nd military spy satellite

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — North Korea on Monday announced plans to launch a rocket apparently carrying its...

Putin arrives in Uzbekistan on the 3rd foreign trip of his new term

MOSCOW (AP) — Russian President Vladimir Putin arrived Sunday in the capital of Uzbekistan where he is to hold...

4 people killed and over 30 injured after a bus and a cargo train collide in Peru

LA OROYA, Peru (AP) — Four people were killed and more than 30 others were injured after a passenger bus and a...

Brett Barrouquere the Associated Press

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) -- Two sisters in rural Kentucky who lived for more than 20 years without Social Security numbers will get the government recognition after settling a lawsuit.

Under Tuesday's agreement, the State Department will issue passport cards to Raechel and Stephanie Schultz, who live in the tiny enclave of Lily. Those cards can be taken to the Social Security Administration, which has agreed to accept the cards as proof of U.S. citizenship and issue Social Security numbers to the women.

Upon receiving the passport cards, the sisters will have five days to apply for Social Security numbers, under the terms of the settlement.

The sisters sued in federal court in July, after being turned away on multiple attempts at getting a card because of a lack of documentation proving their citizenship.

The sisters have no phone. Calls to their attorney, Douglas Benge of London, Ky., were not immediately returned Wednesday morning. The federal government did not admit wrongdoing as part of the settlement.

Raechel, 29, was born at a home in Madison County, Ky., near where the family lives now; Stephanie, 23, was delivered in the back of a Dodge van in southern Alabama. The births were recorded in a family Bible but were otherwise not documented.

Their mercurial parents settled into a hardscrabble existence about 14 years ago along the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains, where the family car broke down. The girls were home schooled by their college-educated parents.

The earliest years for the Schultz sisters were nomadic. The family traveled through 42 states, never staying too long in one place. Their father found occasional work in construction or at restaurants and the children picked up cans to make a few bucks. They stayed in motels or camped and the sisters' grandparents sent money to help.

On its website, the Social Security Administration lists documents that may be used to prove identity, age and citizenship. The accepted records include a birth certificate, driver's license, state-issued identification card or U.S. passport, and it's not entirely clear why they have been denied.

Raechel and Stephanie Schultz started to push for Social Security cards about five years ago so they could get jobs beyond bartending and making jewelry, repainting old furniture and bartending. Raechel even posed as her mother to get a job at a restaurant.

Everyone else in the family has a Social Security number, including an older sister now living in New Orleans who got her Social Security card as a teenager on her second try. She had a birth certificate and a baptismal record.

After being rejected by the Social Security Administration for lack of proper documentation, the sisters sued in state court in 2009, seeking birth certificates. Circuit Judge John Knox Mills in 2010 ordered DNA tests to prove the women were born to their parents, then ordered the records issued.

"The court has no reason to not believe the testimony and finds no reason to suggest the plaintiffs are seeking this relief for an illegal or immoral purpose," Circuit Judge John Knox Mills wrote in his 2010 order.

The Skanner Foundation's 38th Annual MLK Breakfast