03-05-2024  3:28 am   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Washington State Agrees $8 Million a Year for Tribes Hit By Opioid Deaths

With Native Americans and Alaska Natives in Washington dying of opioid overdoses at five times the state average Washington lawmakers have agreed to allocate milliona year to 29 federally recognized tribes in Washington from a half-billion-dollar settlement between the state and major opioid distributors. The funds will help tribes address the opioid crisis

Civil Rights Attorney Ben Crump Receives Honorary Doctorate from Lewis & Clark College

Crump has represented the families of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Henrietta Lacks. 

Washington State House Overwhelmingly Passes Ban on Hog-tying by Police

The vote on Wednesday came nearly four years after Manuel Ellis, a 33-year-old Black man, died in Tacoma, Washington, facedown with his hands and feet cuffed together behind him.

NEWS BRIEFS

Senate Passes Emergency Housing Stability and Production Package with Bipartisan Support

Major legislation works to stabilize and house Oregonians living on the streets, put affordable housing within reach for everyone ...

House Passes Oregon Drug Intervention Plan (ODIP)

New approach to crisis response aims to increase opportunities for treatment, reduce recidivism, and prevent overdoses ...

House of Representatives Addressed Oregon’s Addiction Crisis

We are committed to closely monitoring the rollout of this bill, particularly with concerns to racial disparities. ...

Moving Ahead to 'A Better Red'

Tri Met’s MAX Red Line trains will begin serving the new Gateway North MAX Station on Monday, March 4. ...

Portland Value Inn Is Renamed Jamii Court

The new name for this affordable housing redevelopment, Jamii, means community and togetherness in Swahili ...

Oregon lawmakers voted to recriminalize drugs. The bill's future is now in the governor's hands

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — The future of an Oregon bill that would roll back the state’s first-in-the-nation drug decriminalization law is now in the hands of Democratic Gov. Tina Kotek. The bill — which would make the possession of small amounts of drugs a crime once more — has...

History-rich Pac-12 marks the end of an era as the conference basketball tournaments take place

LAS VEGAS (AP) — Tara VanDerveer managed to compartmentalize her emotions as she chased down and eclipsed Mike Krzyzewski’s all-time wins record earlier this season, determined to focus only on the moment ahead. And that's how the Hall of Fame Stanford coach is approaching the...

Georgia hosts Ole Miss after Murrell's 21-point game

Ole Miss Rebels (20-9, 7-9 SEC) at Georgia Bulldogs (15-14, 5-11 SEC) Athens, Georgia; Tuesday, 7 p.m. EST FANDUEL SPORTSBOOK LINE: Bulldogs -2; over/under is 149 BOTTOM LINE: Ole Miss plays the Georgia Bulldogs after Matthew Murrell scored 21 points in Ole...

East leads Missouri against No. 13 Auburn after 27-point game

Auburn Tigers (22-7, 11-5 SEC) at Missouri Tigers (8-21, 0-16 SEC) Columbia, Missouri; Tuesday, 9 p.m. EST FANDUEL SPORTSBOOK LINE: Tigers -11.5; over/under is 149 BOTTOM LINE: Missouri hosts the No. 13 Auburn Tigers after Sean East scored 27 points in...

OPINION

Message from Commissioner Jesse Beason: February is 'Black History and Futures Month'

I am honored to join the Office of Sustainability and to co-sponsor a proclamation to mark “Black History and Futures Month” ...

Ending Unfair Contracts Harming Minority Businesses Will Aid Gov. Kotek’s Affordable Housing Goals

Senate Bill 1575 will protect small businesses from state and local government’s unfair contract practices while also allowing the building industry to help the governor meet her affordable housing project goals. ...

February is American Heart Month

This month is a time to recognize that heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States, especially in the African American community ...

Thrilling History of Black Excellence in Our National Parks

In every facet of American life -from exploration; conquest; defense; economy; resistance; conservation and the pursuit of human rights – I can show you a unit of the National Park System where the event took place, where African Americans made the...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Miami Beach is breaking up with spring break — or at least trying to

MIAMI BEACH, Fla. (AP) — Miami Beach is trying to break up with spring break, but it's not yet clear whether spring break will take the hint. After three consecutive years of spring break violence, Miami Beach officials are implementing monthlong security measures aimed at curbing...

Crowded race for Alabama's new US House district, as Democrats aim to flip seat in November

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — The race for Alabama's 2nd Congressional District, which was redrawn by a federal court to boost the voting power of Black voters, has sparked congested and competitive primary contests. Democrats see an opportunity to flip the Deep South congressional seat...

Girl Scouts were told to stop bracelet-making fundraiser for kids in Gaza. Now they can't keep up

Missouri Girl Scout leaders threatened legal action against a troop that made bracelets to raise funds for starving children in Gaza, provoking outrage and ridicule from the girls’ supporters and advocates for people trapped in the Palestinian territory by the latest humanitarian crisis. ...

ENTERTAINMENT

Ned Blackhawk’s 'The Rediscovery of America' is a nominee for ,000 history prize

NEW YORK (AP) — Ned Blackhawk's “The Rediscovery of America,” winner last fall of a National Book Award, is a finalist for a history honor presented by the J. Anthony Lukas Prize Project. Blackhawk's account of Native Americans over the past five centuries is among five nominees...

Once doomed to cult status, the animated satire 'Clone High' finds a new life on Max

NEW YORK (AP) — In one of the weirdest high schools in history, Cleopatra is dating class president Frida Kahlo and John F. Kennedy's best friend is Abraham Lincoln. This is “Clone High,” a cult animated show that's enjoying a new life on the streamer Max some two decades after...

Book Review: Thomas Mullen’s portrayal of a divided nation in 1943 draws parallels to today

It’s 1943, a quarter century after the armistice that ended the so-called Great War, and Americans are once again fighting in foreign lands, battling the ascendant Empire of Japan in the Pacific and confronting Germany’s Afrika Corp along the southern rim of the Mediterranean Sea. ...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

China sets an economic growth target of around 5% but acknowledges it will not be easy to achieve

BEIJING (AP) — China aims to achieve 5% economic growth this year, Premier Li Qiang said Tuesday, acknowledging...

Industrial fire and multiple explosions shoot debris into the air in Detroit suburb

CLINTON TOWNSHIP, Mich. (AP) — A fire raging at an industrial facility caused multiple explosions that rocked...

Democrats make play for veteran and military support as Trump homes in on GOP nomination

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — Highway signs welcome drivers entering North Carolina to “the nation's most military...

France becomes the only country to explicitly guarantee abortion as a constitutional right

PARIS (AP) — French lawmakers on Monday overwhelmingly approved a bill to enshrine abortion rights in France's...

3 Red Sea data cables cut as Houthis launch more attacks in the vital waterway

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — Three cables under the Red Sea that provide global internet and...

Transit of migrants through the Darien Gap resumes as Colombian boat companies end work stoppage

BOGOTÁ, Colombia (AP) — Migrants bound for the U.S. are once again crossing the Darien Gap in large numbers,...

CNN Wire Staff

MANILA, Philippines (CNN) -- Millions of people in the Philippines suffered further torrential rains Wednesday, as deadly floods claimed several more lives and kept many people from returning to their deluged homes.

Forecasters say still more rain is on the way, fueled by seasonal monsoon rains and a nearby tropical storm, but it should start to ease soon.

The reported death toll rose to 16 as the flooding continued, the state-run Philippines News Agency reported.

A landslide in the Manila suburb of Quezon City buried two houses Tuesday, leaving nine people dead and four others injured, according to the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Center. Three of the dead were children, PNA reported.

Seven more deaths were attributed to drowning and electrocution.

As of Wednesday night, the rain was still falling but was beginning to ease across portions of western Luzon, according to CNN forecaster Taylor Ward, a trend expected to continue over the next 24 to 48 hours.

The capital city of Manila has recorded 864 millimeters (34 inches) of rain in 72 hours, compared with an August average of just under 500 millimeters (20 inches). Some surrounding areas have been deluged by over 1 meter (39 inches) of rain in the same three-day period.

The latest downpours came on top of days of rain that had already drenched the area, with August generally the wettest month of the year.

Flooding will continue to be a problem even as the rains lessen, as there is just nowhere for the water to go, Ward said.

Some of the Manila region's 12 million residents returned to work Wednesday, with some stores reopening and heavy congestion on the sodden roads, but the real clean-up is expected to start Thursday.

"It's like a water world," Benito Ramos, head of the country's disaster agency, said of the city Tuesday, according to PNA.

The flooding has forced more than 780,000 people across the country from their homes, the disaster agency said. About 242,000 were staying in emergency shelters Tuesday night, according to the agency.

Many hoped to return to their homes Wednesday but further torrential rains in the afternoon were a setback to efforts to get back to normal.

It may be a while before people can safely leave the shelters, said CNN forecaster Mari Ramos.

An additional concern is that the water will take days, or perhaps weeks, to recede in the lower-lying areas, she said. There could also be further flooding "downstream" as the water drains through the flood plain in the southern portions of the metro area near Laguna de Bay.

This is an area that frequently suffers from serious flooding and was one of the hardest hit during the historic flooding that came with Tropical Storm Ketsana (local name Ondoy) in 2009, Ramos said.

Families who returned to their homes in parts of Quezon City, in metropolitan Manila, found fast-running waters sweeping piles of debris along flooded streets.

Some took to boats to try to recover valuables from the wreckage of their homes, or sought to bail out their flooded rooms with buckets.

CNN iReporter Amoulin Singh said the flooding and rains where he lives in Sampaloc, Manila, were the worst he had seen since Tropical Storm Ondoy walloped the country.

"There's been heavy rain for the past 24 hours and we probably get around 10 minutes of breathing room before the next downpour," Singh, a 28-year-old businessman, said Wednesday.

"The flood is knee-high and slowly rising -- it has entered almost all of the houses in the neighborhood. People are headed to convenience stores to stock on supplies. Everybody is in a bad spot right now."

Rescue requests continued to come in early Wednesday, including some people who were using Twitter to contact the authorities for help.

"Pregnant woman needs help! Staying on top of a roof," one Twitter user posted, followed by an address. "Please help BORRES FAMILY w/ 2y/o child!!," posted another.

Deep water in many parts of metropolitan Manila blocked roads, stranded cars and flooded homes.

In several areas, the water was waist deep or higher, the Metropolitan Manila Development Authority said in its Twitter feed.

In an effort to save lives and make way for rescue and relief efforts, government offices and schools were closed Tuesday and Wednesday, the office of President Benigno Aquino said. Some schools will remain closed Thursday, PNA reported.

Work was also suspended at private offices around the capital region Tuesday.

The national railroad called off services, and many roads were under water. Some dams were beginning to overflow, putting more communities at risk, the authorities said.

The country's weather service -- the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration -- warned residents to expect more landslides and flash flooding Wednesday, and the authorities urged residents in low-lying areas to move to higher ground.

The latest deaths came on top of the 53 people who had already been killed across the Philippines by heavy wind and rain in the past few weeks.

The rain and flooding are the result of the normal summer monsoon enhanced by the effects of Tropical Storm Haikui, the Philippines weather service said. The storm made landfall on the east coast of China on Wednesday morning.

CNN iReporter Genhall Manua Chen in Shanghai, China, noticed the wind begin to pick up in the city around mid-morning local time, before the deluge from Tropical Storm Haikui began.

"There was a lot of preparation. I went downstairs at 4 p.m. and emergency workers were draining the streets and doing their jobs with drainage and transportation safety," he said. "Folks walking around seemed unfazed, but cautious of the weather."

The Philippines had already been lashed by heavy rain and wind in recent weeks resulting from Tropical Storm Saola, which plowed past it before hitting Taiwan and China at the end of last week.

In December, Tropical Storm Washi left more than 1,200 people dead after it set off flash floods that swept away entire villages in the southern Philippines.

CNN's Alex Zolbert in Manila; Jethro Mullen and Anjali Tsui in Hong Kong; and Laura Smith-Spark and Sarah Brown in London contributed to this report.

The Skanner Foundation's 38th Annual MLK Breakfast