05-23-2024  1:54 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Oregon 2024 Primary Results

Maxine Dexter, Janelle Bynum, Dan Reyfield and Elizabeth Steiner secure nominations; other races too soon to call.

AP Decision Notes: What to Expect in Oregon's Primaries

Oregon has multiple hotly contested primaries upcoming, as well as some that will set the stage for high-profile races in November. Oregon's 5th Congressional District is home to one of the top Democratic primaries in the country.

Iconic Skanner Building Will Become Healing Space as The Skanner Continues Online

New owner strives to keep spirit of business intact during renovations.

No Criminal Charges in Rare Liquor Probe at OLCC, State Report Says

The investigation examined whether employees of the Oregon Liquor and Cannabis Commission improperly used their positions to obtain bottles of top-shelf bourbon for personal use.

NEWS BRIEFS

Montavilla Jazz Festival Adds Concerts and Venues to Fall Festival

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Election Day Information in Multnomah County: Ballots Must Be Returned by 8 p.m. May 21

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PCC and Partners Break Ground on Affordable Housing

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Metro Bond Funding, Major Maintenance Dollars Complete Trail Project

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Rose Festival Announces Starlight Parade Grand Marshal

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Centrist challenger ousts progressive prosecutor in DA race in Portland, Oregon

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Centrist challenger Nathan Vasquez ousts progressive prosecutor in district attorney race in Portland, Oregon

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Centrist challenger Nathan Vasquez ousts progressive prosecutor in district attorney race in Portland, Oregon....

Defending national champion LSU boosts its postseason hopes with series win against Texas A&M

With two weeks left in the regular season, LSU is scrambling to avoid becoming the third straight defending national champion to miss the NCAA Tournament. The Tigers (31-18, 9-15) won two of three against then-No. 1 Texas A&M to take a giant step over the weekend, but they...

The Bo Nix era begins in Denver, and the Broncos also drafted his top target at Oregon

ENGLEWOOD, Colo. (AP) — For the first time in his 17 seasons as a coach, Sean Payton has a rookie quarterback to nurture. Payton's Denver Broncos took Bo Nix in the first round of the NFL draft. The coach then helped out both himself and Nix by moving up to draft his new QB's top...

OPINION

The Skanner News May 2024 Primary Endorsements

Read The Skanner News endorsements and vote today. Candidates for mayor and city council will appear on the November general election ballot. ...

Nation’s Growing Racial and Gender Wealth Gaps Need Policy Reform

Never-married Black women have 8 cents in wealth for every dollar held by while males. ...

New White House Plan Could Reduce or Eliminate Accumulated Interest for 30 Million Student Loan Borrowers

Multiple recent announcements from the Biden administration offer new hope for the 43.2 million borrowers hoping to get relief from the onerous burden of a collective

Op-Ed: Why MAGA Policies Are Detrimental to Black Communities

NNPA NEWSWIRE – MAGA proponents peddle baseless claims of widespread voter fraud to justify voter suppression tactics that disproportionately target Black voters. From restrictive voter ID laws to purging voter rolls to limiting early voting hours, these...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

North Carolina public universities board repeals policy in vote that likely cuts diversity jobs

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — North Carolina’s public university system board voted Thursday to repeal a nearly five-year-old diversity, equity and inclusion policy, meaning its 17 schools will likely join other major universities in cutting diversity programs and jobs. The 24-member...

Fate of lawsuit filed by Black Texas student punished over hairstyle in hands of federal judge

GALVESTON, Texas (AP) — A federal judge did not issue an immediate ruling on Thursday after hearing legal arguments over whether to dismiss a lawsuit filed by a Black high school student who has alleged racial and gender discrimination over his monthslong punishment by his Texas school district...

NBA Hall of Famer Dwyane Wade brings the fight back to Florida, launching an online community for transgender youth

MIAMI BEACH, Fla. (AP) — NBA Hall of Famer Dwyane Wade brings the fight back to Florida, launching an online community for transgender youth....

ENTERTAINMENT

Alice Munro, Nobel literature winner revered as short story master, dead at 92

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Celebrity birthdays for the week of May 26-June 1

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Everybody may love Raymond, but Ray Romano loves Peter Boyle

NEW YORK (AP) — “Baffling” is how Ray Romano calls the continued success of “Everybody Loves Raymond,” nearly 20 years after the CBS sitcom ended its nine-season run. “It goes so fast." That success comes as a surprise to the New York City-born comedian, who admits he’s...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

A comment from Trump and GOP actions in the states put contraceptive access in the 2024 spotlight

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UN approves resolution to commemorate the 1995 Srebrenica genocide annually over Serb opposition

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Stage collapse at a campaign rally in northern Mexico kills at least 9 people and injures 121

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Malaysia PM says his country keeps good ties with US but not China phobia, wants to engage both

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Unknown bust of the architect who designed the Florence cathedral dome found after 700 years

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By Dana Bash and Tom Cohen CNN













Gen. Keith Alexander, director of the National Security Agency, disclosed Tuesday, June 18, 2013 that plots to bomb the New York subway system and the New York Stock Exchange were among more than 50 stopped by secret surveillance programs.


Bomb plots targeting the New York Stock Exchange and the city's subway were among more than 50 worldwide thwarted by top-secret surveillance programs since the 2011 al Qaeda attacks on the United States, authorities said on Tuesday.

Gen. Keith Alexander, National Security Agency director, FBI and other officials revealed startling details at a House Intelligence Committee hearing aimed at finding out more about the telephone and e-mail surveillance initiatives that came to light this month through leaks of classified information to newspapers.

It was the most comprehensive and specific defense of those methods that have come under ferocious criticism from civil liberties groups, some members of Congress and others concerned about the reach of government into the private lives of citizens in the interest of national security.

National security and law enforcement officials asserted that the leaks were egregious and carry huge consequences for national security.

"I think it was irreversible and significant damage to this nation," Alexander said when questioned by Rep. Michele Bachmann.

"Has this helped America's enemies?" the Minnesota Republican asked.

"I believe it has and I believe it will hurt us and our allies," Alexander said.

President Barack Obama has defended the programs as necessary in an era of terror, and said they have been vetted by Congress and are subject to strict legal checks.

In an interview with Charlie Rose broadcast on Monday night, Obama said the situation requires a national debate on the balance between security and privacy.

Alexander noted last week in Senate testimony that the surveillance programs helped stop dozens of terror plots.

He briefly mentioned planning to bomb the New York subway system, but fuller details about that and revelations about others emerged on Tuesday in the House.

In all, officials said the controversial surveillance aimed at communications overseas helped to disrupt more than 50 plots globally that were in various stages of planning.

Details of virtually all remain secret, but national security officials said they were working on declassifying more information and could have a report to Congress as early as this week.

"We are revealing in front of you today methods and techniques," said Sean Joyce, deputy FBI director, adding the need to do so reflects the substantial impact the leaks have had on the national security community.

Joyce detailed for committee members e-mail surveillance that helped authorities discover the two New York City plots directed at the stock exchange and the subway.

In the fall of 2009, Joyce said the NSA intercepted an e-mail from a suspected terrorist in Pakistan. That person was talking with someone in the United States "about perfecting a recipe for explosives."

Authorities identified Afghan-born Najibullah Zazi of Denver. The FBI followed him to New York and later broke up planning to attack the subway. Zazi later pleaded guilty and is currently in prison.

In the other New York case, NSA was monitoring a "known extremist" in Yemen who was in contact with a person in the United States. Joyce said the FBI detected "nascent plotting" to bomb the stock exchange, long said by U.S. authorities to be a target of terrorists.

He also said e-mail surveillance also disrupted an effort to attack the office of a Danish newspaper that was threatened for publishing a cartoon of the Prophet Mohammed in 2006.

This one involved David Headley, a U.S citizen living in Chicago. The FBI received intelligence at the time regarding his possible involvement in the 2008 Mumbai terror attack that killed 164 people, Joyce said.

The NSA, through surveillance of an al Qaeda-affiliated terrorist, found that Headley was working on a plot to bomb the newspaper. Headley later confessed to conducting surveillance and was convicted. He also pleaded guilty to conducting surveillance in the Mumbai case.

Lastly, secret surveillance led "tipped us off" to a person who had indirect contacts with a known terrorist group overseas.

"We were able to reopen this investigation, identify additional individuals through the legal process and were able to disrupt this terrorist activity," Joyce said.





Intelligence Committee Chairman Mike Rogers welcomed the testimony.

"I think you have struck the right balance between protecting sources and methods, and maintaining the public's trust, by providing more examples of how these authorities have helped disrupt terrorist plots and connections," Rogers, a Michigan Republican, said.

The hearing came one day after the admitted leaker of documents to Britain's Guardian newspaper and the Washington Post about the classified surveillance programs sought to defend his actions.

In a series of blog posts on the Guardian website, Edward Snowden said he disclosed the information because Obama worsened "abusive" surveillance practices instead of curtailing them as he promised as a presidential candidate.

The former NSA contractor insisted that U.S. authorities have access to phone calls, e-mails and other communications far beyond constitutional bounds.

While he said legal restrictions can be easily skirted by analysts at the NSA, FBI and CIA, Snowden stopped short of accusing authorities of violating specific laws.

Instead, he said toothless regulations and policies were to blame for what he called "suspicionless surveillance," and he warned that policies can be changed to allow further abuses.

Under questioning from Rogers, Alexander said the NSA does not have the authority to listen to phone calls of U.S. citizens or read their e-mails under the two surveillance programs.

He also said there was no technology for a lone analyst to arbitrarily listen to Americans' phone calls or read their e-mails.

The Skanner Foundation's 38th Annual MLK Breakfast