12-05-2023  4:25 am   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Oldest Black Church in Oregon Will Tear Down, Rebuild To Better Serve Community

As physical attendance dwindles, First African Methodist Episcopal Zion is joining the growing trend of churches that are re-imagining how best to use their facilities.

Cities Crack Down on Homeless Encampments. Advocates Say That’s Not the Answer

Homeless people and their advocates say encampment sweeps are cruel and costly, and there aren't enough shelter beds or treatment for everyone. But government officials say it's unacceptable to let encampments fester and people need to accept offers of shelter or treatment, if they have a severe mental illness or addiction.

Schools in Portland, Oregon, Reach Tentative Deal With Teachers Union After Nearly Month-Long Strike

The agreement must still be voted on by teachers who have been on the picket line since Nov. 1 over issues of pay, class sizes and planning time. It must also be approved by the school board.

Voter-Approved Oregon Gun Control Law Violates the State Constitution, Judge Rules

The law is one of the toughest in the nation. It requires people to undergo a criminal background check and complete a gun safety training course in order to obtain a permit to buy a firearm. It also bans high-capacity magazines.

NEWS BRIEFS

Talk A Mile Event Connects Young Black Leaders with Portland Police Bureau Trainees

Talk A Mile operates on the idea that conversation bridges gaps and builds empathy, which can promote understanding between Black...

Turkey Rules the Table. But an AP-NORC Poll Finds Disagreement Over Other Thanksgiving Classics

Thanksgiving may be a time for Americans to come together, but opinion is divided over what's on the crowded dinner table. We mostly...

Veteran Journalist and Emmy Award-Winning Producer to Lead Award-Winning Digital Magazine Focused on Racial Inequality

Jamil Smith will drive The Emancipator’s editorial vision and serve as a key partner to Payne in growing the rising media...

Regional Arts & Culture Council and Port of Portland Announce Selection of PDX Phase 1 Terminal Redevelopment Artists

Sanford Biggers and Yoonhee Choi’s projects will be on display with the opening of the new terminal in May 2024 ...

Portland Theatres Unite in ‘Go See A Play’ Revival Campaign

The effort aims to invigorate the city's performing arts scene. ...

1 of 3 Washington officers charged in death of Black man Manuel Ellis testifies in his own defense

TACOMA, Wash. (AP) — One of the three police officers charged with killing Manuel Ellis, a Black man whose death in 2020 as he pleaded for air became a touchstone for racial justice protesters in the Pacific Northwest, took the witness stand in his own defense Monday, saying he lamented Ellis'...

Heisman finalists: LSU QB Daniels, Oregon QB Nix, Washington QB Penix Jr., Ohio St WR Harrison Jr.

LSU's Jayden Daniels, Oregon's Bo Nix and Washington's Michael Penix Jr., transfer quarterbacks who have all played at least five college seasons, and Ohio State receiver Marvin Harrison Jr. were announced as the Heisman Trophy finalists on Monday night. The Heisman has been given to...

AP names LSU's Daniels unanimous SEC offensive player of year; Watson named top defensive player

LSU quarterback Jayden Daniels is the unanimous pick as Associated Press Southeastern Conference offensive player of the year, while Mississippi State linebacker Nathaniel Watson is defensive player of the year. Missouri coach Eliah Drinkwitz won coach of the year honors Monday after...

Big Ten power Ohio State plays rising SEC team Missouri in 88th Cotton Bowl

Ohio State (11-1, Big Ten) vs. Missouri (10-2, SEC), Dec. 29, 8 p.m. ET (ESPN) LOCATION: Arlington, Texas. TOP PLAYERS Ohio State: WR Marvin Harrison, 1,211 yards receiving, 15 touchdowns, 18.1 yards per catch. Missouri: QB Brady Cook, 3,189...

OPINION

Why Are Bullies So Mean? A Youth Psychology Expert Explains What’s Behind Their Harmful Behavior

Bullied children and teens are at risk for anxiety, depression, dropping out of school, peer rejection, social isolation and self-harm. ...

Federal Agencies Issue $23 Million Fine Against TransUnion and Subsidiary

FTC and CFPB say actions harmed renters and violated fair credit laws ...

First One to Commit to Nonviolence Wins

Every time gains towards nonviolence looked promising, someone from the most aggrieved and trauma-warped groups made sure to be spoilers by committing some atrocity and resetting the hate and violence. ...

Boxes

What is patently obvious to all Americans right now is the adolescent dysfunction of Congress. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

After racist shooting that killed 3, families sue Dollar General firms and others over lax security

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (AP) — Family members of three Black people fatally shot at a Dollar General store in north Florida by a racist gunman have sued the store's landlord, operator and security contractor for negligence, claiming lax security led to their loved ones' deaths. The...

Handcuffed and sent to the ER – for misbehavior: Schools are sending more kids to the hospital

SALISBURY, Md. (AP) — Three times a week, on average, a police car pulls up to a school in Wicomico County on Maryland’s Eastern Shore. A student is brought out, handcuffed and placed inside for transport to a hospital emergency room for a psychiatric evaluation. Over the past...

Today in History: December 5, Nelson Mandela dies at 95

Today in History Today is Tuesday, Dec. 5, the 339th day of 2023. There are 26 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: On Dec. 5, 2013, Nelson Mandela, the anti-apartheid leader who became South Africa’s first Black president, died at...

ENTERTAINMENT

Book Review: ‘Eyeliner' examines the staple makeup product's revolutionary role in global society

Zahra Hankir opens “Eyeliner: A Cultural History” by marveling over her mother’s elegant beauty process as she delicately sweeps black kohl on her waterline, dreaming of displaying that same confidence one day. For Hankir, eyeliner is more than just a cosmetic product. It...

Eddie Izzard returns to New York for a version of Shakespeare's 'Hamlet' with just one actor onstage

NEW YORK (AP) — Eddie Izzard is returning to a New York stage this winter for an ambitious version of “Hamlet.” It's ambitious because the actor-comedian will be the only one on stage. Izzard will play all the William Shakespeare parts in a one-person staging adapted by Izzard's...

Music Review: Violent Femmes debut, a cult favorite, turns 40 with an expanded new edition

In 1983, Milwaukee trio Violent Femmes released their self-titled debut, an album that would quickly enter the college-rock pantheon for its spirited acoustic punk. Forty years later, Craft Recordings has released a deluxe edition of the record, in which the cult band turns back the...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

UN agency cites worrying warming trend as COP28 summit grapples with curbing climate change

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — The United Nations weather agency is reporting that glaciers shrank more than...

China's government can't take a joke, so comedians living abroad censor themselves

WASHINGTON (AP) — Comedian Xi Diao says he knows he should avoid talking politics on stage, but sharing a family...

AI's future could be 'open-source' or closed. Tech giants are divided as they lobby regulators

Tech leaders have been vocal proponents of the need to regulate artificial intelligence, but they’re also...

Israel orders evacuations as it widens offensive, but Palestinians are running out of places to go

KHAN YOUNIS, Gaza Strip (AP) — Israeli warplanes heavily bombarded an area around Khan Younis in southern Gaza...

In the salt deserts bordering Pakistan, India builds its largest renewable energy project

KHAVDA, India (AP) — Rising from the bare expanse of the large salt desert that separates India from Pakistan is...

UN warns that 2 boats adrift in the Andaman Sea with 400 Rohingya aboard desperately need rescue

BANGKOK (AP) — An estimated 400 Rohingya Muslims believed to be aboard two boats adrift in the Andaman Sea...

Greg Botelho CNN

(CNN) -- More than 50 years ago, military brass sat down the couple who'd become Susan Green's parents.

They told them how horrible it would be if a black man and a white woman wed at a time when interracial marriage was illegal in parts of the United States.

They did it anyway.

Six years later, in 1967, they celebrated when the Supreme Court ruled in Loving v. Virginia that no state could stop different races from marrying.

For years, Susan Green knew their anguish, their struggle, their determination.

Today, she knows their joy.

Green thought of her parents three years ago as she tearfully filled out a license to wed her partner Robin Phillips in Provincetown, Massachusetts. The seaside enclave was more than 2,500 miles away from their home state of Arizona, where same-sex marriage has been banned.

She cried more tears of joy Wednesday, when the Supreme Court struck down part of the Defense of Marriage Act in ruling the federal government cannot treat legally married gay and lesbian couples differently from heterosexual ones.

"This must have been what Mom and Dad felt like when the Loving case was decided," Green said. "It was the beginning, and it was the acknowledgment they had the right to marry, they had the right to be together."

Green and Phillips haven't kept secret the fact they're lesbians, or that they're together. They joke about being the only married couple on the faculty at Arizona State University's Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication and are grateful for their colleagues support.

It hasn't been easy, though.

In November 2008, Arizona voters passed an amendment to the state constitution defining marriage as "only a union of one man and one woman."

That meant -- as it does for others in 37 states where same-sex marriage is not or will soon not be legal -- Green and Phillips were, in legal terms, little more than roommates.

Even after their Massachusetts nuptials, Green fought through health ailments and worried that if something happened to her, Phillips wouldn't get her Social Security benefits.

"As we start to get older and think about retirement and things like that, all of these issues come into play," Green said.

Wednesday ended up being a "little crazy" in the best possible way with laughter, tears and relief.

They breathed easier not having to worry about things that they might have the day before. They rejoiced the federal government finally will recognize their union as valid. They celebrated that gay rights had come so far, and that they'd been around to see it happen and to talk to the world about it.

"This is a great thing," Phillips said. "And it helps us share our stories."

They've been doing that at Arizona State for years, where Green said students she's never met regularly show up at her door, asking for help figuring out how to come out to their families and friends.

Others come to them fearful of getting outed at work, and theoretically fired, given that most states still don't have laws that prohibit terminating someone because they are gay or transgendered.

"I'm out, and I'm there for them," Green said. "... I serve in a lot of different ways."

Having the chance to help people is one reason the pair wants to stay in Arizona.

It may be easier to go elsewhere, to a state like New York or Washington, where there would be no questions about whether they'd get the same rights as heterosexual couples.

Wednesday's Supreme Court ruling, notably, didn't mandate everyone recognize same-sex marriages: That's still up to the individual states. It doesn't change anything in Arizona, for instance.

But Arizonans need to know that there are happy, productive same-sex couples in their midst, not for them all to go elsewhere, Green said. It's harder for them to be foreign or an unknown if they work down the hall, live down the block or shop at the same store.

Besides, Green said, her parents didn't teach her to give up when they steadfastly insisted on getting married, whatever anyone else thought.

"Some states may be easier to live in," she said. "But I can't let my mom and dad down."

CNN's Jen Christensen contributed to this report.