05-23-2024  3:20 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Oregon 2024 Primary Results

Maxine Dexter, Janelle Bynum, Dan Reyfield and Elizabeth Steiner secure nominations; other races too soon to call.

AP Decision Notes: What to Expect in Oregon's Primaries

Oregon has multiple hotly contested primaries upcoming, as well as some that will set the stage for high-profile races in November. Oregon's 5th Congressional District is home to one of the top Democratic primaries in the country.

Iconic Skanner Building Will Become Healing Space as The Skanner Continues Online

New owner strives to keep spirit of business intact during renovations.

No Criminal Charges in Rare Liquor Probe at OLCC, State Report Says

The investigation examined whether employees of the Oregon Liquor and Cannabis Commission improperly used their positions to obtain bottles of top-shelf bourbon for personal use.

NEWS BRIEFS

Montavilla Jazz Festival Adds Concerts and Venues to Fall Festival

Festival features a three-day village-style celebration of local, world-class artistry with more than 30 concerts and events across 12...

Election Day Information in Multnomah County: Ballots Must Be Returned by 8 p.m. May 21

Today, May 21, 2024, is the last day to vote in the primary election. ...

PCC and Partners Break Ground on Affordable Housing

The new development, set to be a vibrant community hub, will feature 84 income-based apartments ...

Metro Bond Funding, Major Maintenance Dollars Complete Trail Project

Vibrant Communities Commissioner Dan Ryan’s allocation of 0,000 in Park System Development Charge funds will further enhance...

Rose Festival Announces Starlight Parade Grand Marshal

The Portland Rose Festival announced today the 2024 CareOregon Starlight Parade Grand Marshal is Jenny Nguyen, founder and CEO of The...

Centrist challenger ousts progressive prosecutor in DA race in Portland, Oregon

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Centrist district attorney candidate Nathan Vasquez has ousted the incumbent progressive prosecutor in Oregon’s Multnomah County, home to Portland, after running a campaign in which he vowed to be tough on crime. One of District Attorney Mike Schmidt’s...

Centrist challenger Nathan Vasquez ousts progressive prosecutor in district attorney race in Portland, Oregon

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Centrist challenger Nathan Vasquez ousts progressive prosecutor in district attorney race in Portland, Oregon....

Defending national champion LSU boosts its postseason hopes with series win against Texas A&M

With two weeks left in the regular season, LSU is scrambling to avoid becoming the third straight defending national champion to miss the NCAA Tournament. The Tigers (31-18, 9-15) won two of three against then-No. 1 Texas A&M to take a giant step over the weekend, but they...

The Bo Nix era begins in Denver, and the Broncos also drafted his top target at Oregon

ENGLEWOOD, Colo. (AP) — For the first time in his 17 seasons as a coach, Sean Payton has a rookie quarterback to nurture. Payton's Denver Broncos took Bo Nix in the first round of the NFL draft. The coach then helped out both himself and Nix by moving up to draft his new QB's top...

OPINION

The Skanner News May 2024 Primary Endorsements

Read The Skanner News endorsements and vote today. Candidates for mayor and city council will appear on the November general election ballot. ...

Nation’s Growing Racial and Gender Wealth Gaps Need Policy Reform

Never-married Black women have 8 cents in wealth for every dollar held by while males. ...

New White House Plan Could Reduce or Eliminate Accumulated Interest for 30 Million Student Loan Borrowers

Multiple recent announcements from the Biden administration offer new hope for the 43.2 million borrowers hoping to get relief from the onerous burden of a collective

Op-Ed: Why MAGA Policies Are Detrimental to Black Communities

NNPA NEWSWIRE – MAGA proponents peddle baseless claims of widespread voter fraud to justify voter suppression tactics that disproportionately target Black voters. From restrictive voter ID laws to purging voter rolls to limiting early voting hours, these...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

NBA great Dwyane Wade launches Translatable, an online community supporting transgender youth

MIAMI BEACH, Fla. (AP) — NBA Hall of Famer Dwyane Wade was back in South Florida on Thursday to do battle again. He spent more than 14 seasons as a guard for the Miami Heat, winning three championships, having Miami-Dade County nicknamed “Wade County,” and he still leads the...

Baltimore's former top prosecutor spared prison for mortgage fraud and perjury

GREENBELT, Md. (AP) — A former Baltimore city prosecutor who achieved a national profile for charging police officers in a Black man’s death was spared prison time in her sentence Thursday for perjury and mortgage fraud. Democratic former State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby's sentence...

Group of graduates walk out of Harvard commencement chanting 'Free, free Palestine'

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (AP) — Hundreds of students in graduation robes walked out of the Harvard commencement on Thursday chanting “Free, free Palestine” after weeks of protests on campus and a day after the school announced that 13 Harvard students who participated in a protest encampment would...

ENTERTAINMENT

Alice Munro, Nobel literature winner revered as short story master, dead at 92

Nobel laureate Alice Munro, the Canadian literary giant who became one of the world’s most esteemed contemporary authors and one of history's most honored short story writers, has died at age 92. A spokesperson for publisher Penguin Random House Canada said Munro, winner of the...

Celebrity birthdays for the week of May 26-June 1

Celebrity birthdays for the week of May 26-June 1: May 26: Sportscaster Brent Musburger is 85. Drummer Garry Peterson of The Guess Who is 79. Singer Stevie Nicks is 76. Actor Pam Grier is 75. Actor Philip Michael Thomas (“Miami Vice”) is 75. Country singer Hank Williams Junior is...

Everybody may love Raymond, but Ray Romano loves Peter Boyle

NEW YORK (AP) — “Baffling” is how Ray Romano calls the continued success of “Everybody Loves Raymond,” nearly 20 years after the CBS sitcom ended its nine-season run. “It goes so fast." That success comes as a surprise to the New York City-born comedian, who admits he’s...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

UK politicians kick off a 6-week election campaign with incumbent Sunak playing the underdog

LONDON (AP) — Britain’s political party leaders crisscrossed the country on Thursday, kicking off a six-week...

Toronto awarded WNBA's first franchise outside US, with expansion team to begin play in 2026

Toronto has been awarded the WNBA’s first franchise outside the United States, with the expansion team set to...

Rutgers, Northwestern defend deals with student protesters: 'We had to get the encampment down'

WASHINGTON (AP) — The presidents of Northwestern and Rutgers universities defended their decisions to end...

In South Africa, a community struggling for clean water reflects wider discontent ahead of election

HAMMANSKRAAL, South Africa (AP) — On days when a municipal truck comes to Hammanskraal to deliver drinking...

Russian missiles kill 7 in Ukraine's second-largest city as Moscow's troops press offensive

KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — Russian missiles slammed into Ukraine’s second-largest city in the country's northeast...

'Heat dome' leads to sweltering temperatures in Mexico, Central America and US South

Extreme heat in Mexico, Central America and parts of the U.S. South has left millions of people in sweltering...

By Ed Payne and Dan Merica CNN



Lawmakers in Washington are concerned that they were left in the dark about an internal audit that found the National Security Agency had broken privacy rules "thousands of times each year" since 2008. The audit was first reported by the Washington Post on Thursday.

Democratic Sen. Patrick Leahy of Vermont, chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, said Friday that his committee will hold another hearing on the Post's revelations.

"I ... will continue to demand honest and forthright answers from the intelligence community," Leahy said. "I remain concerned that we are still not getting straightforward answers from the NSA."

He gave no timetable for the hearing.

NSA leaker Edward Snowden -- whose ongoing leaks have riled the Obama administration and intelligence community -- provided the material to the Post earlier this summer.

The May 2012 audit found 2,776 incidents of "unauthorized collection, storage, access to or distribution of legally protected communications" in the preceding 12 months, the Post reported in its story.

"Most were unintended. Many involved failures of due diligence or violations of standard operating procedure," said the Post article by reporter Barton Gellman. "The most serious incidents included a violation of a court order and unauthorized use of data about more than 3,000 Americans and green-card holders."

Leahy was not the only lawmaker to call for more oversight and hearings.

"Press reports that the National Security Agency broke privacy rules thousands of times per year and reportedly sought to shield required disclosure of privacy violations are extremely disturbing," said House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, a Democrat from California. "Congress must conduct rigorous oversight to ensure that all incidents of non-compliance are reported to the oversight committees."

Pelosi called for "rigorous oversight" on the "incidents of non-compliance."

Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California, chairwoman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, told the Post in a statement late Thursday night that her committee "can and should do more to independently verify that NSA's operations are appropriate, and its reports of compliance incidents are accurate."

The Washington Post reported that most incidents involved unauthorized surveillance of Americans or foreign intelligence targets in the country. In one case, the NSA decided it didn't need to report the unintended surveillance.

In 2008, a "large number" of calls placed from Washington were intercepted due to a programming error that confused the capitol's 202 area code for 20, the international dialing code for Egypt. The information came from a "quality assurance" review that wasn't distributed to the NSA overnight staff, according to the Post.

Separately, an NSA new collection method went undiscovered by the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court for months. The court, which has authority over some of the agency's operations, ruled it unconstitutional.

Responding to the Post's story, the NSA said, "A variety of factors can cause the numbers of incidents to trend up or down from one quarter to the next."

Factors can include implementation of new procedures, technology or software changes and expanded access.

"The one constant across all of the quarters is a persistent, dedicated effort to identify incidents or risks of incidents at the earliest possible moment, implement mitigation measures wherever possible, and drive the numbers down," the agency said.

The agency released another statement Thursday night defending its programs.

"NSA's foreign intelligence collection activities are continually audited and overseen internally and externally," it said. "When NSA makes a mistake in carrying out its foreign intelligence mission, the agency reports the issue internally and to federal overseers -- and aggressively gets to the bottom of it."

Snowden stepped forward publicly in June to claim responsibility for leaking to the media that the NSA had secretly collected and stored millions of phone records from accounts in the United States. The agency also collected information from U.S. companies on the Internet activity of overseas residents, he said.

Snowden fled first to Hong Kong and then to Russia before Moscow granted him temporary asylum despite pressure from the Obama administration to return him to the United States to face charges.

He has been charged with three felony counts, including violations of the U.S. Espionage Act, for the leaks.

Although polling shows Americans harbor skepticism of the domestic surveillance programs Snowden revealed, a majority of Americans don't approve of the actions he took and they think he, as an American citizen, should be brought to justice.

A CNN/ORC International survey released last month indicated that 52% of the public disapproved of Snowden's actions, while 44% said they approved of the leaks. Fifty-four percent of those questioned in the poll said the government should attempt to bring Snowden back to the United States and prosecute him for his leaks.

As for the program Snowden revealed, there is a noticeable generational divide on the surveillance tactics, with younger Americans more likely to support Snowden than older Americans.

 

The Skanner Foundation's 38th Annual MLK Breakfast