09-30-2023  8:04 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4

NORTHWEST NEWS

2 Lawsuits Blame Utility for Eastern Washington Fire That Killed Man and Burned Hundreds of Homes

The suit alleges the utility designed its power lines to be bare, uncovered and carry a high voltage. All of that increases the risk of ignition when coming into contact with grass or equipment.

Damian Lillard Traded From the Trail Blazers to the Bucks in 3-Team Deal

The deal ends Lillard's 11-year run with the Trail Blazers and a a three-month saga surrounding Lillard's wish to be moved elsewhere in hopes of winning an NBA title.

PPS Announces ‘Incremental Improvements’ in Student Test Scores. Black Education Advocates Are Less Impressed.

Portland Public Schools announced last week that the city's students were doing better than their counterparts elsewhere in the state. But those gains are not equally distributed. 

What's Next in Major College Football Realignment? How About a Best-of-the-Rest League

Now that the Power Five is about to become the Power Four, the schools left out of the recent consolidation of wealth produced by conference realignment are looking at creative ways to stay relevant.

NEWS BRIEFS

Broadway Rose Theatre Names New Executive Director

Meredith Gordon will assume the role on October 2, 2023. ...

Rep. Annessa Hartman Denounces Political Violence Against the Clackamas County Democratic Party

On Tuesday, the Clackamas County Democratic Party headquarters was

Bonamici Announces 5 Town Hall Meetings in October

The town hall meetings will be in St. Helens, Hillsboro, Seaside, Tillamook and Portland. ...

Nicole De Lagrave Named Multnomah Regional Teacher of the Year

De Lagrave is also a finalist for 2023-24 Oregon Teacher of the Year ...

KBOO Birthday Block Party to be Held September 23

Birthday block party planned as KBOO, 90.7FM celebrates 55 years broadcasting community radio ...

Man accused of locking a woman in a cell in Oregon faces rape, kidnapping charges in separate case

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — A man accused of abducting a woman in Seattle, driving her hundreds of miles to his home in Oregon and locking her in a makeshift cinder block cell is facing fresh charges of kidnapping and rape in a separate case involving alleged crimes two months earlier, court documents...

Group of homeless people sues Portland, Oregon, over new daytime camping ban

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — A group of homeless people in Portland, Oregon, filed a class action lawsuit on Friday challenging new restrictions the city placed on daytime camping in an attempt to address safety issues stemming from a crisis of people living on the streets. The lawsuit...

Brady Cook throws for career-high 395 yards, No. 23 Missouri beats Vandy 38-21

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Brady Cook is a big reason that the Missouri Tigers are off to their best start since 2013. The 23rd-ranked Missouri Tigers quarterback set the Southeastern Conference record for most pass attempts without an interception Saturday as he threw for a...

No. 23 Missouri finally leaves state to open SEC slate at Vanderbilt, which has lost 3 straight

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Missouri coach Eli Drinkwitz hasn't spent much time thinking about getting the Tigers back into the AP Top 25 for the first time since 2019. “Rankings only matter what you do this week, so our goal was not to be ranked in Week Four,” Drinkwitz said....

OPINION

Labor Day 2023: Celebrating the Union Difference and Building Tomorrow’s Public Service Workforce

Working people are seeing what the union difference is all about, and they want to be a part of it. ...

60 Years Since 1963 March on Washington, Economic Justice Remains a Dream

Typical Black family has 1/8 the wealth held by whites, says new research ...

The 2024 Election, President Biden and the Black Vote

As a result of the Black vote, America has experienced unprecedented recovery economically, in healthcare, and employment and in its international status. ...

Federal Trade Commission Hindering Black Economic Achievement

FTC Chair Linda Khan has prioritized her own agenda despite what Americans were telling her they needed on the ground ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Latest search for remains of the Tulsa Race Massacre victims ends with seven sets of remains exhumed

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — The latest search for the remains of victims of the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre has ended with 59 graves found and seven sets of remains exhumed, according to Oklahoma state archaeologist Kary Stackelbeck. The excavation ended Friday, Stackelbeck said, and 57 of...

Rejected by US courts, Onondaga Nation take centuries-old land rights case to international panel

ONONDAGA NATION TERRITORY (AP) — The Onondaga Nation has protested for centuries that illegal land grabs shrank its territory from what was once thousands of square miles in upstate New York to a relatively paltry patch of land south of Syracuse. It took its case to President George...

Alabama objects to proposed congressional districts designed to boost Black representation

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — The Alabama attorney general’s office said Thursday that it opposes all three congressional maps proposed by a court-appointed special master as federal judges begin drawing new lines to create a second majority-Black district in the state or something close to it. ...

ENTERTAINMENT

Book Review: 'The Spice Must Flow' chronicles the legacy of the breakthrough novel 'Dune'

NEW YORK (AP) — The saga of how cult sci-fi novel “Dune” slowly permeated the mainstream over decades is a tale with almost as many twists and turns as “Dune” itself, and author Ryan Britt recounts it in the lively and entertaining “The Spice Must Flow.” As Britt...

Spain charges pop singer Shakira with tax evasion for a second time and demands more than million

BARCELONA, Spain (AP) — Spanish prosecutors have charged pop star Shakira with failing to pay 6.7 million euros (.1 million) in tax on her 2018 income, authorities said Tuesday, in Spain’s latest fiscal allegations against the Colombian singer. Shakira is alleged to have used an...

Sanaz Toossi, Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright, makes the leap to star in her own play, 'English'

NEW YORK (AP) — Theatergoers seeing the Pulitzer Prize-winning play “English” at the Barrington Stage Company will have a treat this fall. They'll get to see the playwright up on stage. Sanaz Toossi steps into the role she wrote as one of four Iranian students preparing for an...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Pope Francis creates 21 new cardinals who will help him to reform the church and cement his legacy

VATICAN CITY (AP) — Pope Francis created 21 new cardinals at a ritual-filled ceremony Saturday, including key...

Anti-abortion groups are at odds on strategies ahead of Ohio vote. It could be a preview for 2024

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Abortion opponents in Ohio are at odds not only over how to frame their opposition to a...

U2 concert uses stunning visuals to open massive Sphere venue in Las Vegas

LAS VEGAS (AP) — It looked like a typical U2 outdoor concert: Two helicopters zoomed through the starlit sky...

A doctor caught in the crossfire was among 4 killed in a gunbattle at a hospital in Mexico

MEXICO CITY (AP) — Hitmen stormed a hospital in northern Mexico in a bid to kill a patient but they clashed with...

Polish opposition leader Donald Tusk seeks to boost his election chances with a rally in Warsaw

WARSAW, Poland (AP) — Polish opposition leader Donald Tusk is facing an uphill battle to win new hearts in his...

Kronthaler’s carnival: Westwood’s legacy finds its maverick heir in Paris

PARIS (AP) — An afternoon of stardom, surprise and style reverberated in the heart of Paris Fashion Week on...

By Dan Merica CNN





President Barack Obama said he believes the latest revelation that the National Security Agency inadvertently collected emails of some Americans shows "all these safeguards, checks, audits, oversight worked."

Obama said in an exclusive interview with CNN "New Day" anchor Chris Cuomo that he is confident no one at the NSA is "trying to abuse this program or listen in on people's e-mail." The president chalked much of the concern with domestic snooping on changes in technology.

"I think there are legitimate concerns that people have that technology is moving so quick," Obama said. "What I recognize is that we're going to have to continue to improve the safeguards and as technology moves forward, that means that we may be able to build technologies that give people more assurance."

The Washington Post reported last week that an internal audit of the NSA found the agency had broken privacy rules "thousands of times each year" since 2008. The 2012 audit discovered 2,776 incidents of "unauthorized collection, storage, access to or distribution of legally protected communications" in the preceding 12 months.

"Most were unintended," the Post reported. "Many involved failures of due diligence or violations of standard operating procedure. The most serious incidents included a violation of a court order and unauthorized use of data about more than 3,000 Americans and green-card holders."

The Post received the internal audit from NSA leaker Edward Snowden, who began the on-going controversy over domestic surveillance when he stepped forward publicly in June to claim responsibility for leaking to the media that the NSA had secretly collected and stored millions of phone records from accounts in the United States.

Snowden fled first to Hong Kong and then to Russia before Moscow granted him temporary asylum despite pressure from the Obama administration to return him to the United States to face charges.

For providing documents to the Guardian newspaper and the Post, the government has charged Snowden with three felony counts, including violations of the U.S. Espionage Act, for the leaks.

The revelations of domestic surveillance have led many Americans, according to polls, to harbor skepticism about the NSA programs.

"There's no doubt that, for all the work that's been done to protect the American people's privacy, the capabilities of the NSA are scary to people," Obama said.

Earlier this week, the Obama administration declassified opinions from a secret court that oversees government surveillance showing the National Security Agency was broadly collecting domestic Internet communications of Americans and misrepresenting the scope of that effort to the court.

U.S. District Judge John Bates of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court scolded the government in one opinion for collecting information beyond what it gets from Internet service providers, and included data that was entirely domestic. According to Bates' opinion, the monitoring proved to be "substantial intrusions on Fourth Amendment protected interests."

Although Obama said he understands the concerns over the NSA program, he said it was important to remember that other countries "have these capabilities."

"These (spying capabilities) aren't unique to the NSA," Obama said. "Even as we put in safeguards to make sure that the U.S. government doesn't abuse these capabilities, we've also got to make sure that foreign governments aren't hacking into our banks, aren't hacking into our critical infrastructure, are making sure that consumers are protected."

 

CNN's Evan Perez and Ed Payne contributed to this report.